The Truth Hurts: King Tom Brady Reigns over Pittsburgh in Steelers Patriots Rivalry

In case you haven’t been paying attention to the latest edition of the Steelers Patriots rivalry (or simply tried to block it out of your mind), the Steelers are home for the rest of the postseason, after suffering a humiliating 36-17 loss to the Patriots in the AFC Championship game at Gillette Stadium this past Sunday night.

  • If the words “humbling” and “embarrassing” sound familiar to you with regards to Pittsburgh’s run-ins with the Patriots over the years, that’s because they’re pretty accurate and descriptive.

After Sunday’s loss, the Steelers are now 2-10 against New England in games in the Tom Brady era. Furthermore, after accruing another  three touchdown passes in the title game, Brady now has 22 to zero interceptions when facing the Steelers in the Mike Tomlin era, which started in 2007.

Steelers Patriots rivalry, Sammie Coates, Logan Ryan, Eric Rowe, Rob Ninkovich, Steelers vs Patriots

Sammie Coates doesn’t stand a chance as 4 Patriots gang-tackle him in the AFC Championship game. Photo Credit: Steelers.com

And if you want to really be sick to your stomach, you may need a bucket after learning that the Steelers’  had zero passes defensed against Tom Brady on Sunday, this despite him dropping back to pass 42 times.

  • If there ever was a team that had another’s number, it’s the Patriots over the Steelers.

Obviously, if you are a die-hard Steelers fan, you were hoping against hope that they’d be able to exorcise the New England demons and walk out of Gillette Stadium with a postseason victory and a trip to Super Bowl LI.

  • Unfortunately, if you  really are a die-hard fan of the Black-and-Gold, you now realize the Patriots are clearly the superior franchise and have been for the past 15 years.

I mean, did Sunday’s loss look any different to you than the debacles that took place at Heinz Field in both January of 2002 and January of 2005, when Pittsburgh fell victim to the Patriots with a trip to the Super Bowl on the line?

Going into the game, this one had the feel that it might be different. After all, there were a lot of Steelers-Patriots playoff firsts in this one:

At the end of the day, it might has well have been Kordell Stewart under center handing off to Amos Zereoue and trying to hit Bobby Shaw in the slot, with Lee Flowers and Dewayne Washington tackling receivers as Brady picked apart the Steelers zones.

They seemed all-too familiar, and now, after clinching their seventh trip to the Super Bowl since 2001, it’s clear the Patriots, and not the Steelers, are the standard of this excellents modern era.

Steelers Patriots Rivalry Decidedly One-Sided

Oh sure, the Steelers, with 10 playoff appearances, eight division titles, six AFC title game appearances, three trips to the Super Bowl and two Lombardi Trophies since 2001, have been one of the stars of the NFL in the 21st century. But the Patriots, with 14 AFC East titles, seven trips to the Super Bowl and four Lombardi Trophies over that same time-frame, are rightfully the measuring stick for all NFL franchises.

And there’s nothing wrong with that. While Pittsburgh, with its four Super Bowl victories in six seasons, was the dynasty of dynasties of the 1970s, the Cowboys and Raiders, with their star-studded rosters and combined three Super Bowl titles, certainly carved their own places in NFL lore.

  • The only problem is, it appears that the Patriots’ dynasty, one that seemed destined to end years ago, will continue on for seasons to come.

Bill Belichick, for all his faults with regards to Spygate, is one whale of a head coach. Belichick took over as New England’s coach in 2000, stumbled upon  the greatness of Tom Brady due to injury and soon found a formula for success, one where he has discovered a knack for going after a specific type of player at a specific type of position (can you tell where Wes Welker began and where Julian Edelman ends?) and plugging that player into his system and having success.

Steelers Patriots rivalry, Ryan Clark, Wes Welker, Steelers vs Patriots

Ryan Clark tackles Wes Welker in the Steelers 2008 win over the Bradyless Patriots. Photo Credit: Stephan Savoia, AP via Post-Gazette

Sure, it helps to have Tom Brady at quarterback, but the scary thing about him is, at age 39, he shows no signs of slowing down. I mean, we’re not talking about Peyton Manning, who threw nine touchdowns to 17 interceptions in his last season in 2015; Brady threw 32 touchdowns to only two interceptions in 2016, while only being sacked 15 times in 432 passing attempts.

  • In other words, Brady looks like he can play another five years, and if you’re a Steelers fan who watched him carve their defense up in the AFC Championship game, that has to be kind of chilling.

In-addition to Belichick, Brady, the system the Patriots employ and their franchise-wide commitment to winning, New England has and apparently will continue to benefit from an overall weak AFC East Division.

Comparing Steelers Patriots Rivalry to Steelers Rivalries of Old

If you are old enough to remember the ’70s, you know that while the Steelers dominated the old AFC Central to the tune of seven division titles, they still had to stave off the Browns, Bengals and Oilers, who were determined to build their franchises up in-order to compete. Houston came close, challenging the Steelers two years in a row in the AFC Championship game, while the Bengals swept Pittsburgh in both 1980 and 1981 and actually advanced to Super Bowl XVI, following the ’81 season.

Joe Greene, Dan Pastorini, Steelers vs Oilers, Steelers Oilers AFC Championship, 1978 AFC Championship

Joe Greene closes in on Dan Pastorini in the 1978 AFC title game. Photo Credit: Steelers.com

Besides the Patriots, only two teams have won the AFC East since 2001–the Jets in ’02 and the Dolphins in ’08. The Bills haven’t been to the playoffs since before New England’s run started (1999), the Jets’ last postseason appearance was 2010, while Miami just made it back this year after an eight season absence.

With Rex Ryan, Mark Sanchez and a great defense, it looked as if the Jets would become a worth challenger to New England, and they were…for two seasons, before imploding into just another doormat in the division.

  • In other words, nobody in the Patriots’ division appears to be even close to challenging them now or over the next few years.

Say what you will about the Baltimore Ravens and Cincinnati Bengals, but they’ve gone about trying to challenge Pittsburgh in the AFC North–particularly Baltimore, who has simply built its franchise to beat the Steelers over the years and with great success.

If you’re New England, and you know you’re all but guaranteed five or six wins within your own division every year, you just have to win another six or seven against the rest of the league in-order to capture no worse than a number two seed and a bye into the second round of the postseason.

  • If you do that every year–New England hasn’t had to play in the Wildcard round since 2009–the odds of getting to the Super Bowl increase that much more.
  • To summarize, the Steelers have been a major player in this era, but the Patriots are clearly the standard for success.

And it doesn’t look like New England’s dominant run either over the NFL or in the Steelers Patriots rivalry will end any time soon.

 

 

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It Is Time for Steelers to Beat Patriots in Playoffs and Climb Stairway to Seven

It is time for the Pittsburgh Steelers to beat the New England Patriots in the playoffs. While a Steelers win at Gillette Stadium won’t bring home another Lombardi, they must execute on this step to make another Super Bowl win a possibility.  When asked about the states in the game, James Harrison spelled out the Steelers situation perfectly:

Everything up to now is a waste if we don’t hold the Lombardi at the end of it. There’s only one successful team at the end of the year. That’s the one holding the Lombardi.

James Harrison’s Lombardi logic is both clear and indisputable. But there’s also an irony in it that raises the stakes for the overall franchise, if not for the men on the field. By beating the Patriots in the AFC Championship, the Steelers would be securing, for another year Chuck Noll’s historical legacy.

James Harrison, Steelers vs. Patriots, Steelers Patriots AFC Championship

Even blatant holding can’t stop James Harrison from strip-sacking the Patriots. Photo Credit: Jim Davis, Boston Globe

Preserving Chuck Noll’s Super Bowl Record

If press questions are any guide, no one on the South Side is focusing on this issue. Good. That’s the way it should be. As Mike Tomlin has stated time and time again, winning a Super Bowl for the sake of winning a Super Bowl remains the franchise’s sole focus.

  • That’s why, prior to Super Bowl XL, Dan Rooney told the team to disregard any “One for the Thumb” talk.

The message an mindset in the Steelers locker room going into the AFC Championship game against the Patriots hasn’t changed. Team’s falter when players, coaches and even front office staff get caught up in chasing records or legacies.

  • Fortunately citizens of Steelers Nation and their scribes don’t suffer those same limits.
Chuck Noll, Chuck Noll vs. Bill Belichick, Chuck Noll Super Bowl

A Steelers win against Patriots in the AFC Championship will preserve a tie for another year. Photo Credit: CBS Sports via Scoopnest

There’s not a lot to discuss here because the math is simple. Chuck Noll has four Super Bowl titles to is name. Bill Belichick, the man Chuck Noll beat in his final game, also has four Super Bowl titles to his name. If the Steelers beat the Patriots in the AFC Championship, then Bill Belichick’s Lombardi count remains frozen at 4 for another year at least.

  • Nietzsche argued that philosophers debated each other through the course of history.

Sports dynasties aren’t so lucky. Time renders comparisons between greats from different eras meaningless, if entertaining. But there are rare occasions when a franchise can defend its historical legacy against a modern threat.

  • Think of Don Shula gathering the ’72 Miami Dolphins for the ’85 Dolphins upset of the ’85 Bears.

The Steelers AFC Championship game against the Patriots presents a similar occasion, and it would be nice to see the team take a step at preserving Chuck Noll’s Lombardi legacy, even for another year. Enough said.

It’s Time for Steelers to Beat Patriots

Since their January 1998 AFC Divisional playoff win over Pete Carroll’s Patriots, the Steelers are 3-10 vs. the Patriots and 0-2 against New England in the playoffs. It is time for Mike Tomlin’s team to take the field at Gillette Stadium and pen a different story for Pittsburgh.

 

Bud Dupree, Tom Brady, Steelers vs. Patriots, Steelers Patriots AFC Championship, Bud Dupree sacks Tom Brady

Bud Dupree sacks Tom Brady in 2015 opener. Photo Credit: NFL.com, used on Spectrum News

  • The odds makers advise that favoring the Patriots is a smart move.

Given Tom Brady and Bill Belichick’s record at home it is hard to argue. But this game also represents several firsts for the Steelers in their history against the Patriots:

  • The Patriots have never played against all 3 Steelers Killer Bees
  • James Harrison will start his first playoff game against the Patriots
  • Ryan Shazier, Lawrence Timmons and Stephon Tuitt likewise will play playoff game against the Patriots

Bill Belichick undoubtedly has a plan to neutralize the combined threat of Le’Veon Bell, Ben Roethlisberger and Antonio Brown. So be it. We already know that Eli Rogers, Darrius Heyward-Bey, Cobi Hamilton and/or Jesse James must step up for the Steelers in the Red Zone.

  • Word is the interior of the Patriots line is weak, opening opportunities for Shazier, Timmons and/or Javon Hargrave to get pressure up the middle.

But Belichick knows this and is planning accordingly, just as he’s planning to counter the Steelers counter to beef up protection in the middle by brining Harrison and Bud Dupree on the edges.

  • The time for strategizing and speculation is ending and the moment for execution is about to begin.

Super Bowl windows take an inordinately long time to pry open, only to slam shut in the blink of an eye. Roethlisberger, Harrison, Timmons, William Gay and long snapper Greg Warren are the only Steelers who wear Super Bowl rings. Antonio Brown, Ramon Foster, David Johnson and Maurkice Pouncey are the only other members of the Black and Gold remaining from the Super Bowl XLV team.

  • The window is open for the Steelers to climb the Stair Way to Seven.

Its time for Pittsburgh to seize the opportunity. It’s time for the Steelers to beat the Patriots in the playoffs to win the AFC Championship and head to Super Bowl LI.

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Wouldn’t It Be Nice If Terry Bradshaw Made Up with the Steelers. For Good…?

As you probably know, former Pittsburgh Steelers quarterback and four-time Super Bowl winner, Terry Bradshaw made news recently for criticisms levied against current head coach Mike Tomlin.

I won’t get into debating the merits the argument — this site has defended Tomlin against Bradshaw already and, besides, his record speaks for itself–but this latest setback in the relationship between Bradshaw and the Steelers, their fans and the City of Pittsburgh is just sad, annoying and above all unfortunate.

It also begs the question:

  • What happened to the halftime hatchet burying that happened in 2002 at the 50-yard line of Heinz Field during a Monday night game against the Colts?

The exact date in question was October 21, 2002, and in-case you missed it, it was perhaps the greatest “welcome home” in Pittsburgh sports history.  All seemed to be well then. Alas, it was just another zig zag in the up and down relationship between the Terry Bradshaw and the Pittsburgh Steelers.

Terry Bradshaw, Chuck Noll, Andy Russell, Terry Bradshaw Heinz Field

Terry Bradshaw interviews Chuck Noll at Heinz Field as Andy Russell looks on in 2003. Photo Credit: Matt Fried, Post-Gazette

The Blonde Bomber’s Roller Coaster Ride Through Steelers Nation

It must be acknowledged that Steelers fans have had a love/hate relationship with Terry Bradshaw. During the early portion of his career, as Bradshaw’s struggled to make the transition from college to the NFL, fans could be particularly harsh.

By the time the Steelers started winning Super Bowls however, things turned mostly to love as the quarterback ascended to the heights of his profession and position (four-time Super Bowl-winner, two-time Super Bowl MVP, one-time NFL MVP). When Terry Bradshaw returned to Pittsburgh in 2002, the faithful at Heinz Field cheerfully embraced No. 12 after nearly two decades of distance and disdain following Terry Bradshaw’s retirement in 1984 (the distance and disdain coming mostly from the quarterback, himself).

Months after that Heinz Field homecoming, Terry Bradshaw was back in town to get inducted into the Dapper Dan Hall of Fame in February of 2003, and who did he ask to present him? None other than his old head coach, Chuck Noll, the guy Bradshaw spent so many years criticizing for what he felt was poor treatment during his playing days.

Terry Bradshaw, Chuck Noll

Terry Bradshaw and Chuck Noll on the sidelines. Photo Credit: Steelersuk.com

According to so many who were around during Terry Bradshaw’s time in Pittsburgh–including his teammates, former PR man Joe Gordon and even Chuck Noll, himself — the feud with his old coach was basically one-sided, with Bradshaw either unwilling or unable to let go of the past.

  • Terry Bradshaw spent most of his induction speech wooing the crowd with his charisma and storytelling, but most importantly, apologizing to his old coach for the rift between the two.

Here is a quote from Bradshaw’s speech, courtesy of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

If I could reach down in my heart, I would say I’m sorry for every unkind word and thought I ever had. I mean that. I’m ashamed about that. It was…my wrong, my childness, my selfishness. Having said that, it kind of cleanses me. I miss my coach. I love my coach. I miss Chuck Noll.

The late, great Steve Sabol of NFL Films sat down with Bradshaw later in 2003 to chronicle the quarterback’s struggles during his playing days and also the burying of the hatchet with both the fans and Noll in an interview that was featured on the DVD, Pittsburgh Steelers: The Complete History.

  • It was simply beautiful to watch Bradshaw re-live his pain and also apparently leave it behind for the love he now supposedly had for his old team, his old fans and his old coach.

What followed were a few great years of  Terry Bradshaw coming back to town to engage with the Steelers, the city and the reporters who were more than happy to interview him.

Bradshaw opened up about his loneliness and depression, but he also seemed like the old, charismatic Terry, often recalling many legendary tales with some of his teammates, including the late Dwight White and many, many others.

It was great to see this once rocky relationship seemingly repaired for good. So so we thought….

Terry Bradshaw Relationship with Steelers Regresses (Again)

However, over the past half-decade or so a number of events reopened those rifts betweeen Terry Bradshaw, the city of Pittsburgh and Steelers Nation.

Terry Bradshaw told Ben Roethlisberger to park the motorcycle, and then harshly criticized Ben Roethlisberger for his behavior in Midgeville. Terry Bradshaw failed to attend Chuck Noll’s funeral or even call Marianne Noll despite the fact he was in Western Pennsylvania when Noll passed away.

This latest snub reminded everyone Bradshaw’s decision to skip Art Rooney Sr.’s funeral in 1988 and endearingly apologized for his immaturity in that regard. And, of course, most recently he very publicly derided Mike Tomlin record and coaching ability.

Time Seemingly Doesn’t Heal All Wounds for Terry Bradshaw

When you read books like Their Life’s Work which include quotes from Terry Bradshaw in-which he stated that he didn’t want to talk about or revisit his time with the Steelers, you realize that those old wounds may never, in-fact, be healed.

  • Do they have to be healed, and does Terry Bradshaw have to embrace his old team, his old fans, his old professional football home, his old coach and those fond memories?

Of course not, but for Terry Bradshaw to constantly wonder why he has to revisit the past or doesn’t seem to get why so many people cherish him and those memories is just disingenuous.

Terry Bradshaw, Franco Harris, Rocky Bleier, Steelers 75th Anniversary game

Terry Bradshaw embraces Franco Harris and Rocky Bleier during the Steelers 75th Anniversary Game. Photo Credit: Black and Gold World

Obviously, fans are going to want their four-time Super Bowl-winning quarterback to cherish those Super Bowl years just as much as they do; they’re going to want their old quarterback to come back to town far more often than he does; they’re going to want him to have a better relationship with the Steelers organization and his old teammates.

And, on the negative side, they’re going to lash out when the Blonde Bomber speaks ill of Big Ben; they’re going to show disappointment when Terry Bradshaw doesn’t show up to Chuck Noll’s funeral (even, if, in my opinion, that’s a personal and private matter); and they’ll ridicule him and call him a buffoon when he calls out the current head coach.

  • The people who don’t seem to get that this stuff is important to the fans — including Bradshaw, himself — are like the folks who acted surprised or indifferent about the old football feud between Pitt and Penn State.

Obviously, people wanted that rivalry to resume after it died out in 2000, and the only ones who didn’t were the decision-makers who were unable or unwilling to make it happen for far too many years.

In Terry Bradshaw’s case, if he hasn’t moved past, well, his past, some 35 years after his playing days ended, one has to wonder if he’s either unable or unwilling to do so.

  • Maybe the depression has made him unable to move on. Maybe something else has made him unwilling to do so.

It’s too hard to say for sure.

Obviously, Terry Bradshaw is in a different place in his life right now and is a highly successful motivational speaker and larger-than-life personality as part of Fox’s NFL coverage. He has every right to criticize the Steelers if he feels it’s warranted, and, as fans, we simply have to accept that. This would all be fine, if it didn’t come with all the other baggage that Bradshaw still carries around from his time with the organization.

In many ways, it is bizarre. Think about it, how many iconic sports figures who were as important to an organization as Terry Bradshaw was to the Steelers have this kind of on-going rift with their old team? You could probably count the number on one hand and have a few digits left over.

Terry Bradshaw, Puts Himself on the Outside Looking In

In many ways, Bradshaw was THE main cog in those four Steelers championships. Sure, Dan Rooney hiring Noll as  head coach was maybe the most significant moment in the franchise’s history (some in the organization have credited the great Emperor with showing them what many now call “The Steeler Way”).

Chuck Noll’s drafting of Mean Joe Greene was most important player acquisition in team history, mainly because Joe Greene was maybe the finest leader the franchise ever employed, someone who simply refused to accept losing and demanded accountability from every single one of his teammates.

Terry Bradshaw, Lynn Swann, Super Steelers

Terry Bradshaw and Lynn Swann in the heyday of the Super Steelers. Photo Credit: Getty Images via CBSSports.com

As for Terry Bradshaw, well, it’s like the story he often recalls involving a day in practice just before the glory days were ushered in. Dwight White supposedly hit Bradshaw a little too hard, and the quarterback jumped in the defensive end’s face and said, “You may lose with me, but you’ll never win without me.”

How true of a statement that was. Every NFL team needs a franchise quarterback in order to be a true Super Bowl contender (history has proven that time and time again). Regardless of Chuck Noll’s influence and Joe Greene’s leadership, the Steelers of the 1970s wouldn’t never have established themselves as a pro football’s greatest dynasty had Bradshaw not developed into a Hall of Fame quarterback.

Neither can anyone else.

In many ways, Terry Bradshaw’s career should be held in the same regard as Roberto Clemente’s time with the Pirates or Mario Lemieux’s transforming relationship with the Penguins, but it’s not.

  • And, that’s mostly on Terry Bradshaw.

So, again, does Terry Bradshaw have to embrace his playing days and all things Pittsburgh and the Steelers?

No, but it really would be if Terry Bradshaw and the Steelers made up and made up for good once and for all.

 

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Mike Tomlin’s Record vs Andy Reid ahead of Steelers Divisional Playoff Game Against Chiefs

The Vegas line has the Kansas City Chiefs holding a 2 point edge over the Pittsburgh Steelers heading into the AFC Divisional playoff game. The book makers are favoring the Chiefs despite the fact that Steelers hold a 20-11 advantage in the series, including a 10-7 edge in games played at Arrowhead Stadium, a notoriously difficult place to play. But all of those were regular season match ups.

  • The Steelers and Chiefs have played in the playoffs once, with the Steelers losing in overtime.

That game came after the 1993 season, when James Harrison struggling to hold down a practice squad slot…. (Ha! fooled you didn’t I?) That’s a joke about Harrison, but the game was so long ago that it DOES preceed Steelers defensive line coach Johnny Mitchell’s time with the team, as Bill Cowher fired Steve Furness after that playoff loss.

  • How have things worked out since that fateful day when a Mark Royals’ blocked punt opened the door to another Joe Montana comeback?

Well, per Dale Lolley, the Chiefs are 0-4 at Arrowhead since that win and 1-9 overall in the playoffs. The Steelers in contrast are 19-12 in the playoffs since that day.

The bottom line is that the Steelers and Chiefs don’t have a lot of playoff history so perhaps the operative metric is Mike Tomlin’s record against Andy Reid.

Mike Tomlin, Andy Reid, Ben Roethlisberger, Steelers vs. Chiefs, Mike Tomlin's record vs Andy Reid

Mike Tomlin shakes hands with Andy Reid after the Steelers 2014 win over the Chiefs at Heinz Field. Photo Credit: David Eulitt, The Kansas City Star

Mike Tomlin’s Record vs Andy Reid

Not including Steelers and Eagles annual preseason match ups, Mike Tomlin is 3-2 against Andy Reid. Tomlin’s games against Reid came in 2008, 2012, 2014, 2015 and 2016 which provides a fairly good cross section of both coaches work.

By 2012, both the Steelers and Eagles were in re-building phases as the Steelers prevailed at Heinz Field. In 2014 both the Steelers and Chiefs were fighting to establish themselves as playoff contenders. The Steelers got the better of that December 2014 tussle, while the Chiefs stayed home in January.

By 2015 and 2016 both the Steelers and Chiefs had reestablished themselves as contenders. In fact, Tomlin’s last victory against Andy Reid came in October at Heinz Field as Le’Veon Bell, steamrolled the Kansas City to the tune of 43-14.

Tomlin’s last loss to Andy Reid came in October 2015, with Ben Roethlisberger injured and Landry Jones making his first, unsuccessful, start.

  • At the time it was viewed as a “Tomlin Trap Game” but the Chiefs went on to win 11 straight.
Landry Jones, Tamba Hali, Jaye Howard, Steelers vs. Cheifs Arrowhead

Tamba Hali stip sacks Landry Jones as Jaye Howard recovers in the Chiefs 23-13 win over the Steelers at Arrowhead in October 2015. Photo credit: David Eulitt, Kansas City Star

And those two games perhaps, ominously, highlight the operative trend in Mike Tomlin’s record against Andy Reid. Mike Tomlin is 3-0 against Andy Reid at Heinz Field, but Andy Reid has never lost to Mike Tomlin at home.

So either the Steelers are doomed…

…Or it will come down to the Antonio Brown, Le’Veon Bell and Ben Roethlisberger’s ability to do their thing on offense, with Sean Davis, Ryan Shazier, Lawrence Timmons, Bud Dupree and Stephon Tuitt playing solid defense.

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Le’Veon Bell Breaks Steelers Playoff Rushing Record – Now Pause & Think about What that Means….

For two straight off seasons, Steelers Nation has fretted and fidgeted while watching the Steelers asking the question “What IF.” The big “What IF” of course was “What if Le’Veon Bell had been playing?”

Going into the playoff loss to the Ravens in 2014 (2015, actually) Bell’s absence represented a loss of 34% of the Steelers total offense. It is harder to calculate the impact of Le’Veon Bell’s absence in the 2015 postseason because Bell missed the majority of the season injured or suspended.

But it is quite possible that Ryan Shazier and Ben Roethlisberger’s late game heroics wouldn’t have been necessary against the Bengals had Bell been available to kill the clock in the 4th.

In Pittsburgh’s wild card win against the Dolphins, Steelers Nation finaly got to see their “What IF” come true. So how did that work out?

Le'Veon Bell, Le'Veon Bell breaks Steelers playoff rushing record, Steelers vs. Dolphins, Steelers wild card win dolphins

Le’Veon Bell in his Steelers playoff record breaking performance against the Dolphins. Photo Credit: Barry Reeger, PennLive

  • Le’Veon Bell ran 29 times for 167 yards and scored two touchdowns. In the process, Le’Veon Bell broke the Pittsburgh Steelers single game post-season rushing record.

Let’s restate that: In his first post season appearance, Le’Veon Bell broke the Pittsburgh Steelers single-game playoff rushing record. Now consider what that really means. Had Le’Veon Bell broken this record, say, for the San Francisco 49ers, he wouldn’t have turned many heads, no disrespect to Roger Craig or Rickey Waters.

  • But Le’Veon Bell broke the Pittsburgh Steelers playoff rushing record for a single game.

This is the same franchise that has sent Jerome Bettis, Franco Harris and John Henry Johnson (you forgot about him, didn’t you?) to the Pro Football Hall of Fame. It is the team that gave Willie Parker, holder of the Super Bowl record for the longest run from scrimmage, his shot in the NFL.

What’s more amazing is the way in which Le’Veon Bell broke the record. As Peter King, who is no Steelers cheerleader, observed:

Watch the man. He’s got the oddest rushing style in football today. “The Great Hesitator,” Phil Simms called him on CBS, and that’s just about perfect. Usually, Bell lines up as the classic I-back, seven yards deep, and when he takes a handoff from Ben Roethlisberger, he’ll take a couple of jab steps toward a hole and almost stop in his tracks. Denver, under Mike Shanahan, had a one-cut running style; the back was told to hit up in the hole immediately—that charging into the hole was the one cut. Most coaches decry what they call pussyfooting.

Peter King then backed up his argument with a statistic, that someone on his staff deserves a ton of credit for unearthing:

I find this amazing: Emmitt Smith, the all-time rushing king, gained 860 yards in his best seven-game stretch. That’s 142 yards less than Bell’s current seven-game run.

So in other words, in the space of just 8 games, Le’Veon Bell broken a record set by one Steelers Hall of Fame running back that another Steelers Hall of Fame Running back couldn’t touch, and rushed for 142 yards more than Emmitt Smith rushed for during his best seven-game stretch.

Jerome Bettis, Jerome Bettis AFC Championship, Jerome Bettis Broncos

Jerome Bettis in the 2005 AFC Championship Game. Photo Credit: Jonathan Daniel, Getty Images via BTSC

A little bit of research reveals that it’s not unusual for a Steelers running back to break the century mark in his playoff debut.

  • Barry Foster ran for 104 yards on 20 carries in the 1992 Steelers playoff loss to the Bills
  • Jerome Bettis ran for 102 yards in the Steelers 1996 playoff win against the Colts, although he injured himself
  • Merril Hoge rushed for 100 yards even in the 1989 Steelers New Year’s Eve upset of the Oilers

Rashard Mendenhall, Bam Morris, Frank Pollard and Rocky Bleier also had 100 yard (or near 100 yard) performances early in their careers, but these came after their first post season game.

All impressive efforts, to be certain. But if you really want to appreciate what Le’Veon Bell accomplished, look no further than to the comments made by Ben Roethlisberger:

I’ll never forget when Charlie Batch was here, he used to always tell me about how he would hand off and just watch Barry Sanders. I am not trying to put Le’Veon with Barry Sanders yet, but it is fun to sit and watch and just see what he is going to do because he is incredibly talented.

So if you’re keeping track at home, in addition to outperforming 3 Steelers Hall of Fame running backs, Le’Veon Bell’s playoff performance against the Dolphins has now drawn comparisons to two other non-Steelers Hall of Fame running backs.

Walter Payton, Walter Payton Steelers, Le'Veon Bell Walter Payton

Walter Peyton dives over the pile as the Steelers are powerless to stop him. Photo Credit: Jonathan Daniel, Getty Images via NFL SpinZone

During Le’Veon Bell took a lot of heat during his rookie season with a lot of journalists both inside (see John Stiegerwald) and outside of Pittsburgh doubting his ability. Steel City Insider’s Jim Wexell took the time to compare his game-by-game results to Walter Payton’s rookie campaign, despite getting needled about it on social media from some of his peers.

  • Three seasons, a couple of injuries, 2 suspensions, and 1 playoff game later, Bell is getting the last laugh.

As Ben Roethlisberger cautioned, it is still too early to categorize Bell alongside the Smiths, Harris, Sanders, and Paytons of NFL lore, but in Le’Veon Bell, the Pittsburgh Steelers certainly have a special running back.

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Mike Tomlin Bill Cowher Photo Shows Just How Lucky Steelers Nation Is. Now Enjoy the Playoffs

The Mike Tomlin Billy Cowher photo against the backdrop of the Steelers six Lombardi Trophies interspersed with images of Mike Tomlin, Bill Cowher and Chuck Noll offered Steelers Nation a priceless portrait.

After Super Bowl XLIII, Steel Curtain Rising waged a mini-campaign pushing for the Steelers to snap an actual photo of Tomlin, Cowher and Noll with the six Lombardi’s back when that was still possible, but based on what we know now, Noll’s health probably wouldn’t have allowed it.

Alas, the picture of Pittsburgh’s 3 coaches with the Steelers Six 6 Lombardi trophies never got taken.

Bill Cowher, Mike Tomlin, Chuck Noll, Steelers Six Lombardi Trophies, Mike Tomlin Bill Cowher photo

Bill Cowher interviews Mike Tomlin. Photo Credit: Steelers.com

Yet this single, powerful image conveys the legacy of excellence that defines this franchise.

The Mike Tomlin Bill Cowher photo should also serves another purpose: It reminds Steelers Nation just how lucky we are.

Cowher-Tomlin Transition Resulted in a Decade of Excellence

History doesn’t always lend itself to symmetry, but when it does it makes an occasion a little extra special.

Exactly 10 years to the day after he resigned as Steelers head coach, Bill Cowher returned to Pittsburgh to interview Mike Tomlin ahead of the Steelers AFC Wild Card game vs. the Miami Dolphins. Here’s what has happened since The Chin stepped down:

  • The Steelers have never ended a season with the L’s outnumbering the W’s
  • 7 of those seasons have produced playoff teams
  • 4 of those seasons have resulted in AFC North Championships
  • 2 Lamar Hunt AFC Championship trophies have been added to the case
  • 1 Super Bowl Championship, a record 6th for the franchise, found its home in Pittsburgh

Some will write off this record by insisting “Tomlin has only won with Cowher’s players.” This site has already debunked Colin Cowherd and Jason Whitlock’s tired nonsense. In the pressure cooker that is the NFL, a medicore coach can only ride the coattails of a successful predecessor for a very short time.

  • Barry Switzer would serve as exhibit A, and Mike Martz (nod to Jim Wexell) gives us exhibit B

Point made. Let’s move on because the Bill Cowher Mike Tomlin photo transcends both of its individual subjects to tell us something about the Pittsburgh Steelers as an organization.

The “Other” Rooney Rule Works, and Works Well

Many saw and still see Mike Tomlin’s hire as a product of “Rooney Rule.” Named after Dan Rooney, the rule requires franchises to interview minorities for head coaching vacancies. Mike Tomlin did get hired because of a Rooney Rule, but one very different from Roger Goodell’s.

As Mike Silverstein, aka “Homer J” on Going Deep with the Steelers, has pointed out time and time again, Dan Rooney’s rule for hiring coaches is pretty straight forward:

  • Hire the best guy, and stick with him as long as you can.

Rooney followed that rule with Chuck Noll. Ten years later he’d added 4 Lombardi Trophies where they’d been none. Ten years removed from his hire date, Bill Cowher had yet to bring home “One for the Thumb” but he was closing in on his 4th AFC Championship game. Cowher lost that AFC Championship game as well as his next, but the Rooney’s stuck with Cowher, and he delivered in Super Bowl XL.

  • Too many Steelers fans don’t quite understand how lucky they are.
Super Bowl XL Lombardi Presentation, Bill Cowher Lombardi Trophy, Dan Rooney, Art Rooney II, Kay Cowher

Bill Cowher stands with Kaye Cowher, Art Rooney II and Dan Rooney on the dias after Super Bowl XL. Photo Credit: Mike Urban, Seattle P-I

In college, I roomed with a New York Jet’s fan, who endured Leon Hess’ firing of Pete Carroll after one season. Hess justified his knee-jerk decision by explaining he was 80 and wanted to win a Super Bowl before he died. Hess replaced Pete Carroll with Rich Kotite.

  • For the record, Rich Kotite went 3-13 and 1-15; Pete Carroll is 103-72 and wears a Super Bowl ring.

During the same time frame, the NFL saw Ted Marchibroda take an Indianapolis Colts team that had been 1-15 in 1991, to the 1995 AFC Championship game. If you’ll remember, quick action in the end zone by Randy Fuller on a Hail Mary was what sent Pittsburgh, and not Indianapolis to Super Bowl XXX.

  • Shortly afterwards, the Irsays thanked Ted Marchibroda for turning the team around by firing him and promoted his offensive coordinator Lindy Infante.

For the record, Infante took the Colts to the playoffs in the next season (where the Steelers clobbered them) and went 3-13 a year after. As my friend observed then, “Aren’t you glad you root for a team where that kind of stuff doesn’t happen?”

The answer then and now is “Yes.” And if you claim to be a Steelers fan yours should be the same.

The Playoffs are Here Steelers Nation, Enjoy Them

In just over 24 hours the Pittsburgh Steelers will host their 12 playoff game at Heinz Field.

While durability is becoming an issue, Ben Roethlisberger is still in his prime and he’s about to start a playoff game for the first time with Antonio Brown and Le’Veon Bell. Players like Eli Rogers, Ladarius Green and Jesse James have stepped up during the 7 game winning streak.

  • Cobi Hamilton and Demarcus Ayers, two guys whose names you probably had to look up during training camp, have also delivered big plays when it has counted.
Pittsburgh Killer Bees, Ben Roethlisberger, Le'Veon Bell, Antonio Brown

Pittsburgh’s Killer B’s, Ben Roethlisberger, Antonio Brown and Le’Veon Bell are set to play their first playoff game. Photo Credit: Gene J. Puskar, AP NY Daily News

Ryan Shazier is about to play his third playoff game. Think back to how he stepped up when all hope was lost last year the playoffs against Cincinnati, and then consider how much he’s grown since then.

Shazier isn’t the only linebacker making impact plays – he’s joined by fellow rookie Bud Dupree, and Lawrence Timmons and James Harrison – two veterans who know how to win Super Bowls. Also keep in mind the growth of rookies like Sean Davis, Javon Hargrave and Artie Burns.

Honestly, after all of that, if you’re a Steelers fan focusing on the draft or free agency, then its time to throw in your Terrible Towel.

  • The Pittsburgh Steelers are a team that is entering the playoffs on a hot streak not unlike 2005 or 2008.

Does this mean Steelers Nation should count Lombardi’s before they hatch? No! There’s a reason why ESPN’s Bill Barnwell (who never likes the Steelers) is only giving Pittsburgh a 4.2% chance to win the Super Bowl.

Take the measure of the 2016 Steelers position-by-position against any number of teams in the 2016 playoffs, and the Steelers probably come up short. But during their 7 game winning streak, players from across the Steelers depth chart have shown an uncanny ability to make plays at critical moments.

  • And that, my friends is a characteristic of champions.

As Chuck Noll always reminded us, it’s about the journey not the destination. But reaching the Mountain Top is a realistic possibility. Enjoy the ride Steelers Nation.

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Steelers Playoff History vs Miami Dolphins – Pittsburgh Looks to Even 1-2 Record

When the Pittsburgh Steelers welcome the Miami Dolphins to Heinz Field for the AFC Wild Card game Mike Tomlin’s team will be looking to even the Steelers playoff history vs the Miami Dolphins.

  • The Steelers and the Dolphins have clashed in the playoffs on three prior occasions, with the Steelers holding a 1-3 record.

The first time came at Three Rivers Stadium on New Year’s Eve 1972, in the AFC Championship game a week after the Immaculate Reception. The Super Steelers would clash in the post-season with Don Shula’s Dolphins again before they ended their run in the 1979 AFC Divisional Playoff game. And the final time Chuck Noll would face his mentor Don Shula in the playoffs came at the Orange Bowl in January 1985 in another AFC Championship match up.

Neither Steelers-Dolphins AFC Championship game resulted in a trip to the Super Bowl for Pittsburgh, but the Black and Gold’s luck in the AFC Divisional round was markedly better. Now we’ll take a look at all three, plus a peek at Mike Tomlin’s record vs. the Dolphins.

Terry Bradshaw, Steelers Dolphins 1972 AFC Championship, Steelers vs. Dolphins, Steelers playoff history vs Miami Dolphins

Terry Bradshaw scrambles in Steelers 1972 AFC Championship loss to the Miami Dolphins. Photo Credit: Steelers.com

1972 AFC Championship Game

January 31st, 1972 @ Three Rivers Stadium
Pittsburgh 17, Miami 21

Given that I was only a few months old when during the first Steelers-Dolphins 1972 AFC Championship game From Black to Gold author Tim Gleason surprised me when he listed this game as the biggest playoff disappointment in Steelers history.

  • After all, isn’t the Steelers 1994 AFC Championship loss to the Chargers Steelers Nation’s biggest post-season heartbreak?

While the Alfred Pupunu game certainly ranks, Gleason makes a compelling case for the Steelers 1972 New Year’s eve loss to the Dolphins. But Gleason argues that Don Shula’s famous 1972 undefeated Dolphins squad was in fact rather beatable, benefiting from the third easiest regular season schedule in NFL history that only had them play one winning team.

If the Steelers showed they could hang with the Dolphins, Chuck Noll’s playoff novices made a host of rookie mistakes. The Steelers got on the board first, but ominously Terry Bradshaw fumbled the ball but was saved by Gerry Mullins diving on it in the end zone. As the game wore on, Pittsburgh proved to be less capable of picking up after itself.

  • Dwight White jumped off sides to negate a Jack Ham interception
  • Dolphins punter Larry Seiple caught the Steelers flat footed on a 37-yard fake punt scramble
  • Bob Griese came off the bench to hit Paul Warfield at Andy Russell’s expense to gouge the Steelers for 52 yards
  • A blocked 4th quarter field goal prevented the Steelers from narrowing the score early in the 4th quarter

Terry Bradshaw had left the game in the first half with a concussion, but Terry Hanratty was unable to move the offense. Bradshaw returned, pulled the Steelers to within a touchdown with a 12 yard pass to Al Young. However, Bradshaw would throw interceptions on the next two drives ending Pittsburgh’s comeback hopes.

Not only did this game blunt the euphoria the Immaculate Reception had created a week earlier, but it also coincided with the tragic death of Roberto Clemente, who was probably the best baseball player in Pittsburgh’s history.

1979 AFC Divisional Playoffs

December 30th, 1979 @ Three Rivers Stadium
Pittsburgh 34, Miami 14

Legendary Pittsburgh Post-Gazette scribe Vito Stellino likened this one to Michaelangelo painting the Sistine Chapel. And why not? The Pittsburgh Steelers ran up a 20-0 score before Miami had even run its 8th play from scrimmage. As the first quarter reached its end, Miami had 2 yards of total offense; Pittsburgh had amassed 180.

  • Even a bad call couldn’t disrupt the Steelers on that day.

In the third quarter the officials ruled that Dwayne Woodruff had touched a punt, when in fact replays showed he had not. The Dolphins recovered at the Steelers 11-yard line and scored their first touchdown of the day.

Dwayne Woodruff, Mel Blount, Tony Nathan, 1979 Steelers Dolphins AFC Divisional Playoff game, Steelers playoff history vs dolphins

Dwayne Woodruff and Mel Blount close in on Tony Nathan in the 1979 AFC Divisional Playoff. Photo Credit: miamidolphins.com

Not that it mattered. Terry Bradshaw immediately led them on a 69 yard drive that ended in a Rocky Bleier touchdown. Franco Harris opened the 4th quarter by scoring another touchdown. Miami answered with a touchdown of its own, but it was too little too late.

Jack Lambert, Joe Greene and Gary Dunn combined for 3 sacks on Bob Grisie while Woodruff and Dirt Winston intercepted him twice. After Super Bowl XIII Chuck Noll boldly proclaimed that “this team hasn’t peeked yet.”

The Steelers 1979 Divisional playoff win over the Dolphins proved that the Emperor had been right.

1984 AFC Championship Game

January 6th, 1985 @ The Orange Bowl
Pittsburgh 28, Miami 45

As EVERYONE knows Chuck Noll decided to draft Gabe Rivera instead of Dan Marino in the 1983 NFL Draft and his decision forced Pittsburgh to wait 20 years until it drafted its next Franchise Quarterback, Ben Roethlisberger.

  • But when the Steelers took to the field against the Dolphins in the 1984 AFC Championship, it seemed like that decision might not matter….  Seriously.

A year earlier, the 1983 Steelers had limped into the playoffs on the final throws remaining in Terry Bradshaw’s arm only to have the Los Angeles Raiders man handle them 38-10. Logic dictated that “Decline” would define the 1984 Steelers. Chuck Noll had other ideas.

  • The 1984 Steelers might have only earned a 9-7 record, but they upset Bill Walsh’s 49ers and the defending Super Bowl Champion Raiders along the way.

A week before, Mark Malone spearheaded a dramatic upset of John Elway and Denver Broncos in Mile High. Yes, the Steelers had lost to the 1984 Dolphins 31-7 in early October, but the Steelers string of giant-slaying upsets showed that Pittsburgh had improved since then didn’t it?

Steelers Dolphins 1984 AFC Championship, Dan Marino vs Steelers, Steelers Dolphins Playoff History

Dan Marino shreds Steelers in the 1984 AFC Championship game. Photo Credit: miamiolphins.com

The Steelers intended to use the same game plan that had seen them through to wins over the 49ers and Broncos – dominate at the line of scrimmage, control the clock and blitz the living daylights out of the quarterback.

Unfortunately, that was about the only thing that worked for the Steelers. A week earlier against Denver, Keith Gary, David Little and Mike Merriweather had combined for 4 sacks of John Elway. The Steelers defense failed to land a glove on Dan Marino.

  • To make matters worse, the Steelers couldn’t protect the ball, and the Dolphins capitalized.

Dan Marino had time to torch the Steelers defense for touchdown passes of 40, 41 and 26 yards. For much of the first half however, the Steelers feigned that they could match the Dolphins score for score. But Malone had opened the first half giving up an interception that allowed Miami to score first, and he closed the first half with another allowing Marino to stitch together a 3-play drive that gave them a 24-14 halftime lead.

The Dolphins scored 3 more touchdowns during the second half as the Steelers defense was powerless to slow, let alone stop the Miami juggernaut. In his final playoff game, John Stallworth had 4 catches for 111 yards including a 65 yard touchdown catch giving him league records for post season touchdown receptions and hundred yard games.

And, although Dan Rooney’s outlook following this game was rather rosy, the 1984 AFC Championship loss to the Dolphins also officially confirmed that, by not drafting Dan Marino, the Steelers wouldn’t enjoy back-to-back Super Bowl eras.

Mike Tomlin’s Record Against the Dolphins

Although it has been a long time since the Steelers and Dolphins have faced off in the playoffs, Mike Tomlin is no stranger to Miami, holding a 3-2 record against the Dolphins.

In 2007, the Steelers and Dolphins met on a soggy, rainy Heinz Field during Mike Tomlin’s first year as coach where the Steelers eked out a 0-3 win. The 2009 Steelers closed out their disappointing season with a 30-24 win over Miami that was pleasant, but insufficient to get them into the playoffs. In 2010, the Steelers won a  23-22 contest with controversial swirling over whether a fumble had been a fumble.

  • Mike Tomlin has had a tougher time against Miami during the rebuild following Super Bowl XLV.

In 2013 the Steelers followed their Thanksgiving Day loss to the Ravens with an upset loss to the Dolphins — in the snow at Heinz Field. And back in October this same Pittsburgh Steelers team dropped a 30 to 15 decision to the Dolphins.

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The Blond Bomber Should Shut Up – Terry Bradshaw’s Attacks on Mike Tomlin Incorrect & Out of Line

Let’s get one thing straight. I like Terry Bradshaw. How can we count the ways?

Terry Bradshaw was a childhood idol. As kids we used to play Superfriends pretending Bradshaw and the Steelers were super heroes. During Super Bowl XIV, Bradshaw permanently etched 60-Prevent-Slot-Hook-And-Go, his hook up with John Stallworth, into a 7 year olds memory. In the early 80’s, when Jojo Starbuck came on TV I stuck my tongue out and hissed at her because I’d heard she had martial problems with Bradshaw, and blamed them for fueling the Steelers decline.

  • Sure, there’s some childhood silliness in those anecdotes, but my admiration of Bradshaw has continued as an adult.

I’ve argued vigorously against Bradshaw critics who write him off simple, strong-armed quarterback who was lucky to land on a good team. Likewise, I’ve defended Bradshaw’s on-air buffoonery, explaining that he’s knows what makes for good TV, and likening it to Myron Cope’s contention that Bradshaw played up the “dumb” image to trick opponents into underestimating him.

terry bradshaw, mike tomlin, bill cowher, terry bradshaw attack mike tomlin

Terry Bradshaw’s attacks on Mike Tomlin via Speak for Yourself. Photo Credit: Awfulannoucing.com

And while I’ve generally sided with The Emperor when it comes to Terry Bradshaw’s very public feud with Chuck Noll, I can understand Bradshaw’s hard feelings even if they fail to justify his slights of his coach.

  • But Terry Bradshaw’s attacks on Mike Tomlin go over the line.

Terry Bradshaw is way, way out of line on this one, and the Blond Bomber simply needs to shut up.

Bradshaw in Collusion with Cowherd and Whitlock

Not surprisingly, the venue for Terry Bradshaw’s attack on Mike Tomlin came on Speak for Yourself with Cowherd and Whitlock. Colin Cowherd’s attacks on Mike Tomlin are well chronicled as are Jason Whitlock’s.

If you’re a citizen of Steelers Nation and your register a pulse, then you know that Terry Bradshaw has declared that Mike Tomlin is more of a cheerleader than a great coach. But his full comments bear consideration.

Let’s focus on Bradshaw actual argument:

I don’t think he’s a great coach at all. He’s a nice coach, and I’ve said this. He’s really a great cheerleader guy. I don’t know what he does, but I don’t think he’s a great coach at all. His name never even pops into my mind when we think about great coaches in the NFL.

So Bradshaw begins by saying Tomlin is not a great coach. That’s a bold critique of a Super Bowl winning coach who has 100 wins and has never coached a losing team. So what evidence does he offer to justify his critique?

  • Nothing.

First he claims Tomlin is a “nice” coach, and a “great cheerleader” and then he essentially concedes that he doesn’t have any standing to make his claim by declaring, “I don’t know what he does….” Really?

In other words, Bradshaw is saying, “I don’t know what he does, but do know that he sucks.” Is this the best justification Terry Bradshaw can offer after over 30 years as broadcast journalist?

While Steel Curtain Rising remains a steadfast defender of Mike Tomlin, there ARE any number of legitimate criticism’s that can be leveled at the Steelers head coach. But the “cheerleader” isn’t a criticism, it’s simply an insult.

Bradshaw Contradicts Himself with Cowher Comparison

The Terry Bradshaw’s “Cheerleader” attack on Tomlin got widely quoted, but his further comparison to Bill Cowher didn’t. That’s a shame, because Terry Bradshaw’s comparison of Bill Cowher and Mike Tomlin further confirmed that he doesn’t know what he’s talking about.

When asked by Cris Carter whether he felt Bill Cowher was a great coach, Bradshaw didn’t hesitate:

I think Bill was [a great coach]. Bill came in and took over a team that had been struggling. … The Steelers had some good years, really good years, and then by their standards kinda mellowed out at the end of (Chuck Noll’s) career. In comes Cowher, Cowher kind of gave them that boost to get back up and won a Super Bowl…. I know Cowher, when he came over from Kansas City as a defensive coordinator, and his teams were tough. Tomlin came in from Minnesota, and I didn’t know anything about him.

So what does this Bradshaw’s blather really boil down to?

In case you missed it, Bradshaw again admits he doesn’t know anything about Mike Tomlin. Then, to listen to Terry tell it, Chuck Noll retired, Bill Cowher arrived in, and the Lombardi started rolling back in again.

  • That’s a nice bit of Steelers short-hand history, but unfortunately it doesn’t reflect reality.
rod woodson, carnell lake, st. vincents

Rod Woodson and Carnell Lake at St Vincents. via Steelers.com

First, it fails to acknowledge that Chuck Noll actually handed a reasonably talented team with Hall of Famers Rod Woodson and Dermontti Dawson and All Pros like Greg Lloyd, Carnell Lake. Second, in Bradshaw’s mind the transition between Super Bowl eras from Noll to Cowher was seamless.

In fact, it took Bill Cowher 15 years to win his first Super Bowl.

  • Along the way, Cowher also coached 3 losing seasons; Mike Tomlin has never had even one.
  • Bradshaw conveniently forgets that fact.

And, there’s another irony in Bradshaw’s comparison between Cowher and Tomlin. (And mind this comes from someone who defended Cowher tirelessly against the “he can’t win the big one” crowd.) During Cowher’s tenure he was never thought of as an X’s and O’s mastermind, but rather a coach whose strength in part came from his ability to communicate and motivate his players…

And there’s nothing wrong with that, but Terry Bradshaw is going to stoop to the level of calling Mike Tomlin a cheer leader, they he should hold Bill Cowher to the same standard. Instead, the Blonde Bomber can’t even be bothered….

Terry Bradshaw really needs to shut up.

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5 Key Decisions that Fueled Mike Tomlin’s 100 Wins as Steelers Head Coach

Ask Mike Tomlin about his 100 wins as Pittsburgh Steelers head coach and he’ll tersely explain “It means I’ve been here for a while.” Fair enough, but Mike Tomlin’s 100 wins didn’t come overnight, and certainly didn’t occur because he was in the right place at the right time.

  • No, Mike Tomlin’s 100 wins come because he’s one of the best head coaches in the NFL.

Any head coach’s record is a byproduct of a lot of hours of film study, staffing and personnel choices, strategy adoption and game-day decision making. It is hard for an outsider to pinpoint key moments that directly resulted in a coach’s success.

But we’re going to try. Here are 5 key decisions that fueled Mike Tomiln’s 100 wins as Pittsburgh Steelers head coach.

mike tomlin, mike tomlin's 100 wins steelers head coach,

Quality coaching decisions fueled Mike Tomlin’s 100 wins as Pittsburgh Steelers head coach. (Photo Credit: Andrew Rush, Post Gazette)

1. Adopting while reshaping Bill Cowher’s legacy

Can we please dispense with the “Mike Tomlin has only won with Bill Cowher’s players” nonsense?

Yes, Tomlin did inherit Ben Roethlisberger and a host of Super Bowl XL veterans, but if you think that getting handed the keys to a team that is a year or two removed from a Lombardi Trophy is an automatic key to success, please consult the coaching records of Richie Petitbon, Ray Handley or Phil Bengtson.

  • Mike Tomlin had a real challenge facing him when he took over in 2007.

Most if not all of his locker room expected and wanted either Russ Grimm or Ken Whisenhunt to get the job. Alan Faneca wasn’t happy with his contract. Neither was Joey Porter.

Tomlin was not only smart enough to retain Dick LeBeau as defensive coordinator, but wise enough to sit back and learn from Coach Dad. He also retained several members of Bill Cowher’s staff, while integrating it with new faces he’d brought in with him.

  • Mike Tomlin didn’t shy away from tough choices. With his approval, the Steelers parted ways with Joey Porter.

Part of his motivation no doubt lay in the conclusion that James Harrison needed to start, a move The Chin never made. Tomlin also smoothed over the Alan Faneca situation. Faneca wasn’t happy, but he never caused a disruption because of his contract.

It’s true that Dick LeBeau came “highly recommended” by the Rooneys, but Tomlin could have just as easily kept him and made wholesale changes with the rest of his for the sake of making a statement. Instead, Tomlin pulled off the delicate balance of embracing the legacy that Bill Cowher left him while making the team his own.

2. Going hard on defense in the 2007 NFL Draft

While Mike Tomlin shares drafting authority with Kevin Colbert, the duo didn’t hesitate to break rules by drafting two outside linebackers with their first two picks in the 2007 NFL Draft.

  • No, that’s not a misprint.

The Steelers drafted Lawrence Timmons to play outside linebacker, and he was listed behind James Harrison in the Steelers 2007 Media Guide’s training camp depth chart. After that they picked LaMarr Woodley. They of course moved Lawrence Timmons to the inside. He took a while to develop, but since 2010, he’s been the mainstay of the Steelers defense.

But as Tony Defeo pointed out on Behind the Steel Curtain, LaMarr Woodley registered 44 sacks in 55 games, a pace that not even Hall of Famers like Joe Greene and Kevin Greene or legends such as L.C. Greenwood and Greg Lloyd could match. And of course, LaMarr Woodley’s strip sack of Kurt Warner sealed victory in Super Bowl XLIII.

  • Tomlin and Colbert also picked William Gay during the 2007 NFL Draft.

The Steelers 2007 draft class was was far from perfect. Matt Spaeth was hardly a bust but never lived up to his 3rd round status. Neither did Daniel Sepulveda. And who can remember the other players the Steelers drafted then?

But 100 wins later, Mike Tomlin and Kevin Colbert’s first draft picks are still paying dividends on the field.

3. Standing Up for Bruce Arians in 2009

Mike Tomlin’s first real adversity came during the Steelers 2009 five-game losing streak in a year where the franchise clearly seemed to suffer from a Super Bowl hangover. Fans, bloggers and the professional press were all calling for Bruce Arians’ head.

  • So were some people on the South Side whose opinion actually counts.

As Ed Bouchette reported at the time, “Tomlin is under pressure from the ‘front office’” over Arians. While Arians did do some boneheaded things in 2009 (see the pass happy, empty sets on third and short on a freezing night in Cleveland), the truth is he got unfairly scapegoated a lot too.

  • But Mike Tomlin believed in his offensive coordinator, and he fought for him.

Don’t think for a moment that players, coaches and other members of the Steelers organization weren’t watching Tomlin closely to see whether he would fold.

4. Hiring Todd Haley as his offensive coordinator

Wait a minute! How’s this? How can you pat Mike Tomlin on the back for sticking up for Arians, then in the next breath praise him for a hire that he had to make because Art Rooney II pulled rank on him by forcing Bruce Arians out?

  • Yes, I admit, it does seem like a bit of a contradiction. But it is not.

We know that Mike Tomlin wanted Bruce Arians back and that he was unable (or perhaps less than 100% willing) to convince Art Rooney II to agree. So be it. The ultimate success or failure of the move would lie in how the Steelers offense performed post-Arians.

  • That meant Mike Tomlin had to hire the right replacement.

Mike Tomlin hired Todd Haley, a move that generated its share of controversy. Steelers author Tim Gleason praised the move, while Steelers writer Neal Coolong spoke out harshly against it as soon as Haley’s name surfaced. Ben Roethlisberger and Todd Haley didn’t exactly hit it off either.

But before working with Todd Haley, Ben Roethlisberger was seen as a fine physical talent who excelled at school-yard football. Ben Roethlisberger has grown under Todd Haley. It’s true that Ben Roethlisberger’s road record under Haley remains a concern, but under Todd Haley, Ben Roethlisberger is both playing better football and taking far fewer sacks.

Todd Haley was able to accomplish what Bruce Arians was unwilling even to attempt: find a way to get Ben to release the ball sooner, without taking away what makes Ben, Ben.

5. Pulling out of 2013’s 2-6 Spiral

OK, number 5 doesn’t exactly count as a “decision.” But the turn around of the 2013 Steelers turn around certainly could not have happened without a lot of good decision making.

A lot of NFL teams that start 0-4 probably continue on to 2-6. Your “average 2-6 team” will finish 4-12 with your “above average 2-6 teams” ending somewhere in realm of 5-11 or 6-10. But it is fairly safe to say that a 2-5 team that finds its way to a 2-6 record thanks to a 55-33 loss generally projects to a 2-14 or 3-14 finish.

  • Yet, that is exactly how the first 8 games of the Steelers 2013 season unfolded.

Things looked bleak after the Steelers London loss dropped them to 0-4. Mike Tomlin made changes, and suddenly 0-4 turned to 2-4. Then came disastrous trips to Oakland’s Black Hole and a trip to Gillette Stadium. But the 2013 Steelers fought on, and not only returned to respectability with an 8-8 finish, but they came one blown call away from a trip to the playoffs.

  • Only well-coached teams execute turn arounds like that.

Quitting on a coach is somewhat of an art form in the NFL. The 2013 Steelers always gave Mike Tomlin their best all season long. By the end of the season, their best delivered results.

  • Out of Mike Tomlin’s 100 wins, those 8 from 2013 might have been the hardest fought.

Mike Tomlin coaxed everything he could out of the talent on the 2013 Steelers who lacked depth at several key positions.

Mike Tomlin’s 100 wins are undoubtedly build on dozens of other decisions that the public doesn’t know about, but until those come to light, these are our 5 top choices.

 

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How Kirk Cousins “How Do You Like Me Now?” Callout Vindicates Dan Rooney’s Contract Negotiation Stance

One of the peculiarities of being a Steelers fan first and a football fan second is that it becomes easy to forget just how differently the rest of the NFL operates sometimes. In fact, when I read that a team has extended a contract during the season, my first reaction is often “…But wait a minute, players don’t get signed during the season.

  • But of course they do – It just doesn’t happen in Pittsburgh.

Reading Andrew Brandt’s column in MMQB on the Kirk Cousin’sHow do you like me now?”call out to Washington Redskins General Manager Scot McCloughan, brought home just how wise Dan Rooney was to install the Steelers regular season contract negotiation blackout policy in 1993.

  • Can you imagine something like the Kirk Cousin’s incident happening in Pittsburgh?

No, neither can I. That’s not to say that the Steelers are immune to contract malaise. Alan Faneca was not happy about not getting his extension in 2007, and he grumbled about it loudly in the off season, but that ended when the games started.

Dan Rooney, Steelers contrat negotiation policy

Dan Rooney following the 2010 AFC Championship victory. Photo Credit: Al Bello, Getty Images via BTSC

Jeff Reed likewise was unhappy that the Steelers didn’t extend his contract in 2010, and that unhappiness perhaps contributed to Mike Tomlin’s decision to cut him.

  • But by and large, you don’t see these types of contract-based stories popping up in Pittsburgh during the regular season.

Reporters certainly ask players in their contract years if they want to come back, as they did with Lawrence Timmons after the Steelers win over the Giants, but answers usually run along the lines of “I’d like to stay, but we’ll see what happens in March.”

It wasn’t always that way, however….

Free Agency Comes to Pittsburgh….

1993 was the first season that the NFL experienced free agency, thanks to the Freeman-McNeil verdict. The new era saw the Steelers say good by to long-time stalwarts like Tunch Ilkin, but allowed them to bring in veterans like Hall of Famer Kevin Greene.

  • At the time, most fans thought that Dan Rooney was cheap, but the Steelers also pioneered success in the salary cap era by resigning their own players.

During that 1993 off season, the Steelers came to terms with Neil O’Donnell, Greg Lloyd and Dermontti Dawson a year before their contracts expired (O’Donnell had been a RFA). They also wanted to reach similar deals with Rod Woodson and Barry Foster, but couldn’t get them done in the summer. So negotiations continued, as the 1993 Steelers got off to a 0-2 start.

Patricia Rooney is the only one who knows if her husband Dan watched ESPN PrimeTime that night, but Chris Berman’s lead on the Steelers game talked about the Woodson and Foster contracts, and showed in image of a guy handing out money….

…If Dan Rooney did see that ESPN, he could not have been pleased.

1993 the Year of the Locker Room Lawyer

While the Steelers had locked up their best defensive player and, at the time, best offensive player the rest of the locker room was not happy, particuarly because after inking Woodson and Foster, Dan Rooney and Tom Donahoe decided to cut off further negotiations until season’s end.

Tight end Adrian Cooper went as far as to tell Ed Bouchette of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, “If everyone’s contract would be done, I think we’d be 4-0 instead of 2-2. It has something to do with it. We’re unbeaten since they signed the two big guys.”

Big things had been expected of Adrian Cooper, so much that the Steelers openly discussed trading Eric Green. Cooper’s breakout season failed to materialized, and after the season he explained to reporters, “I feel neglected. As a result, my performance was a reflection of how they treated me.”

  • As soon as Tom Donahoe heard that, Cooper was on the next bus out of town, heading to Minnesota via trade.

But even Merril Hoge, a man whose ethics are beyond question, confided, “When we went 0-2, I think they thought players were more concerned about their contracts. That may have been true.”

After the season Bill Cowher, Dan Rooney and Tom Donahoe all agreed that contract issues had been a distraction for the Steelers in 1993. Their solution was to use the regular season to focus on winning, not negotiating.

The results speak for themselves. Although he may have wanted his contract extension sooner than he got it, Ben Roethlisberger certainly never considered walking off of Heinz Field and screaming “How do you like me now?” at Kevin Colbert, because the focus in Pittsburgh during the season stays where it should, on winning.

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