Painful Picture: Browns Bludgeon Steelers in Wild Card, Likely Ending an Era

Ben Roethisberger, Maurkice Pouncey, Steelers vs Browns, Steelers loss browns wild card

Ben Roethlisberger and Maurkice Pouncey after the wild card loss to the Browns. Photo Credit: Don Wright, AP via USA Today for the win.

Let’s begin with an exercise. Look at the image above. What three words come to mind?

Take a moment. Think. Reflect. Feel.

  • These are my three: Power. Poignancy. Punctuation.

Even if you know nothing about the sport the rest of the world calls “American Football” the power of this image is unmistakable. So too is its poignancy: Something has been lost. The third word is the only one that allows a bit of interpretation: Does this poignant and powerful image punctate something definitive, or does it only capture a moment in time?

Intellectually, it is possible, perhaps even plausible to rationalize scenarios that see the current era of Steelers football continuing. But emotionally, the image Ben Roethlisberger and Maurkice Pouncey together following the playoff loss to the Browns feels like an open and shut case.

These types of images have a way of conveying finality.

And in that, they differ from action shots. Action shots freeze transformational moments forever. Think:

Still shots bear a different breed of power. They communicate something that’s happened in the past that establishes a path for the future. Think of how the shot of Chuck Noll and Terry Bradshaw sneering at each other on the sideline reveals the tempestuous nature that would torture their relationship from the day the Blonde Bomber arrived in Pittsburgh until The Emperor was laid to rest in 2014.

Seeing the image of Ben and Pouncey on the bench at Heinz Field brought to mind another image shot at the same locale.

Jon Witman, steelers fullback jon witman, 2001 steelers afc championship loss patriots

A distraught Jon Witman after the Steelers 2001 AFC Championship loss to the Patriots. Photo Credit: Matt Freed, Post-Gazette

That is of course former Steelers fullback Jon Witman, sitting on the bench following the 2001 AFC Championship loss to the New England Patriots. Take a look at the photo, and consider what followed:

Sure, plenty of players on that ’01 team would bounce back to join Jerome Bettis on the dais at Super Bowl XL, but that AFC Championship loss would be the closest mainstays of the 1990s, guys like Jason Gildon, Lee Flowers and Mark Bruener would ever get to a Super Bowl.

None of that was apparent that day, but glance again at Witman’s drooping head and it all seems so obvious now, acting as a sort of Rosetta Stone for translating Roethlisberger’s and Pouency’s non-verbal language. Let’s look at why.

First Quarter: The Titanic Hits an Iceberg in Just 16 Seconds

As you well know on the very first play Maurkice Pouncey snapped the ball way over Ben Roethlisberger’s head. Some of criticized Ben Roethlisberger for not pouncing on it, but it looked like it was more of an issue of confusion between him James Conner as to who “had it.”

Karl Joseph suffered no such confusion and within 16 seconds the Cleveland Browns had a touchdown.

Teams can effectively respond to debacles like this in two ways:

  • Patch together a slow steady scoring drive
  • Or light up the opposition with a big play

The Steelers did the opposite. Three plays later Ben Roethlisberger tried to hit Benny Snell. His pass was way too high and went right to M.J. Stewart. Three plays an a 40 yard Jarvis Landry reception later and the Browns were scoring again.

  • 4 minutes and 14 seconds had elapsed. The Browns led 14 to 0.

Things got worse.The Steelers got the ball back. They punted after 3 plays. The Browns only need 5 plays, three of which went for double digit yardage, to score again.

  • 11 minutes and 20 seconds had elapsed. The Browns led 21 to 0.

Four plays later, on 2nd and 20 Ben Roethlisberger tried to hit Diontae Johnson. The pass was a tad bit high but catchable. It hit both of Johnson’s hands. But instead of pulling it down and in, the ball bounced off and back. Sheldrick Redwine caught it and returned it 30 yards. Three  plays later the Browns were in the end zone again.

  • 13 minutes and 4 seconds had elapsed. The score was 28-0.

That high snap was akin the iceberg that ripped a hole in the hull of the Titanic. Before the Steelers could even slow the flow of water, they were already down four touchdowns.

As the Titanic Sinks, the Hindenburg Responds Distress Signal

As pointed out in our Rapid Reaction, if you only look at the contest’s final 32 minutes, Pittsburgh played pretty well, out scoring the Browns 30-20. Say one thing – Mike Tomlin’s team refused to quit.

  • But it is hard to do much serious evaluation given that the Browns were playing with such a lead.

Clearly however, Chase Claypool, Diontae Johnson and James Washington made some incredible plays. So did JuJu Smith-Schuster. As did James Conner, practically willing himself into the end zone for the final two point conversion. If this was their last game in Pittsburgh, they both left it all on the field.

  • The Steelers defense, in contrast, left much, far far too much on the field.

Cam Heyward was going up against an offensive lineman who’d met his quarterback hours before the game, yet you’d never know it. T.J. Watt, who has terrorized quarterbacks with relish, never touched Mayfield Baker.  “Minkah Magic” was missing the entire night.

Nick Chubb, Cassius Marsh, Steelers vs Browns

Nick Chubb scores and all Cassius Marsh can do is watch. Photo Credit: Matt Starkey, Browns.com

Not after the turn overs, at the goal line, not in the 4th quarter when the Steelers desperately needed a 3 and out. Instead, the defense allowed the Browns to stitch together a 6 play 80-yard touchdown drive.

A big play or two, a series of sacks, a forced fumble, an interception or a pick six could have made all of the difference.

  • None of those were to be had.

Instead of acting as the cavalry, the Steelers defense looked more like the Hindenburg responding responding to the Titanic’s distress call. If Steelers Wild Card Loss to the Browns does mark the end of the Roethlisberger era, it is a bitter end indeed.

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Rapid Reaction to Steelers Loss to the Browns

The Cleveland Browns eliminated the once Pittsburgh Steelers to the tune of 49-37 on a bleak night at Heinz Field.

The game ended at just before 2:00 am here in Buenos Aires, and with a long work day looming I’m not sure when I’ll be able to get the post-game analysis up. Those are always a challenge following night games, and other events could over take us.

So here is some Rapid Reaction:

Ben Roethlisberger, Steelers vs Browns

Ben Roethlisberger can do nothing after the opening snap flies over his head. Photo Credit: Chaz Palla, Tribune Review

  • The Steelers didn’t play that badly after they spotted the Browns 28 points

Seriously (well, not really), after that the Pittsburgh out score Cleveland 37 to 20. And after the Browns went up 35 to 7, the Steelers held the the Browns to just 13 points. So remember that boys and girls, if you get into an NFL playoff game, its probably not a good idea to spot your opponent four touchdowns.

  • Where was the defense?

This game hinged on turn overs, make no mistake about it. But those turnovers were one sided. The Browns got them (or were handed them) in droves, while the Steelers came up with none. The Steelers have been a take away machine for much of the past two seasons, but when it counted the most they came up with naught.

And it wasn’t just lack of turn overs. T.J. Watt made some nice plays behind the line of scrimmage, but never really got to Baker Mayfield. Minkah Fitzpatrick couldn’t work any of his magic. It is amazing to think that Nick Chubb only had 76 yards, because he seem to run at will.

  • COVID who?

This was the 2nd came where the Steelers supposedly enjoyed an unfair advantage due to a COVID-19 outbreak in the opposition. But you’d have never have known it watching the game. Well, maybe you’d have known it a little, the Steelers could have used Joe Haden.

  • Thank you JuJu, Thank you James

Unless there is a major off season surprise, this was JuJu Smith-Schuster‘s final game with the Steelers. It was also likely James Conner‘s final game with the Steelers. Both players left all they had on the field. James Conner only had 60 total yards, but he scored the team’s first touchdown and willed in the 2 point conversion.

JuJu Smith-Schuster led the Steelers receivers with 13 catches for 157 yards and 1 touchdown. It is a shame that JuJu’s first and fourth seasons with the team are book-ended by bad playoff losses. This is one player who deserved more.

  • Has midnight arrived for Big Ben?

Ben Roethlisberger threw four interceptions. One bounced of Diontae Johnson‘s hands and most certainly should have been caught. Another was tipped at the line of scrimmage — a chronic issue all season long — and perhaps isn’t quite his “fault.”

But the other two were ugly. And there was another “should have been intercepted” ball.

Beyond that, Ben Roethlisberger’s arm looked good. He threw better downfield than at any other point in the season. He’s indicated he wants to keep playing, but he’ll count upwards of 40 million against the salary cap next year.

It will likely be Ben’s choice as to whether he returns or not, but one has to wonder if Art Rooney II isn’t going to be tempted to “officially” begin rebuilding.

That’s all for now folks. Check back in a day or so for our full analysis. Thanks to everyone who came and read this season.

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Can the Steelers Dress Joshua Dobbs vs Browns? Where There’s a Will, There’s a Way

The Steelers 2020 season finale against the Browns contained an unexpected wrinkle: Joshua Dobbs.

Pittsburgh Steelers head coach decided early to “Air Mail” players to the playoffs, including Ben Roethlisberger, T.J. Watt, Cam Heyward, Terrell Edmunds and Maurkice Pouncey. That meant that Mason Rudolph would start.

  • Mason Rudolph indeed started and played very well.
Joshua Dobbs, Jacob Philips, Steelers vs Browns

Joshua Dobbs throws a pass. Photo Credit: Chaz Palla, Tribune-Review

But his understudy Joshua Dobbs also saw action, rushing the ball several times and completing a number of passes (OK, they were shovel passes.) This was a wrinkle that no one was expecting, and given that the Steelers offense is desperate to do anything to breathe life into its running game, deploying Dobbs was a welcome sign.

  • When asked if this could continue in the playoffs, Mike Tomlin deadpanned: “It’s a possibility.”

Yet most pundits wrote this off as head coach bluster designed to give opposing defensive coordinators a little something extra to think about. The reasoning is that Mason Rudolph clearly earned his stripes as Ben Roethlisberger’s number 2 going into the playoffs. Ergo, there’s no way the Steelers would give Joshua Dobbs a helmet over Mason Rudolph.

  • And of course, everyone KNOWS, there’s no way the Steelers would have 3 quarterbacks active on game day.

This is one case where the conventional wisdom is probably right. But it doesn’t have to be. Keeping 3 quarterbacks active isn’t the radical notion that it sounds like. In fact it used to be reasonably common. In fact, keeping three quarterbacks dressed and on the active roster was a critical component of the Steelers first serious attempt at 1 for The Thumb.

3 Quarterbacks, the 1995 Steelers and Slash

Dressing 3 quarterbacks was a fundamental and intentional part of the 1995 Steelers offensive strategy. It started rather unintentionally on opening day when injuries to both Neil O’Donnell and later Mike Tomczak forced Jim Miller into the game for one play (where he threw a long pass that was the equivalent of an interception.)

It was one of the rare times when 3 Steelers quarterbacks threw passes in the same game, and it was the only time that phenomenon occurred in that season.

And while Mike Tomczak wasn’t getting a lot of love, Kordell Stewart was enjoy the heyday of the “Slash Era.” At the time NFL game day rosters limited teams to 45 members, plus an emergency 3rd string quarterback.

Whether Jim Miller continued to suit up as the team’s emergency 3rd stringer while Kordell Stewart was a wide receiver is a question best left to NFL archivists. It doesn’t really matter, because today teams are allowed to dress 46 active players.

The game has certainly changed since 1995. Each team’s personnel needs with regards to injuries, substitutions and situational packages is unique. But if the 1995 Steelers could find a way to dress 4 or 5 wide outs, 2 quarterbacks and a “Slash” then it would see that the 2020 Steelers could find a way to dress Roethlisberger, Rudolph and Dobbs.

For what its worth, and for those of you boning up on your Steelers 3rd string quarterback trivia, the last time times 3 Steelers quarterbacks threw passes in the same game came against the Browns, most recently in the 2008 season finale and prior to that in the 1999 season opener.

If the Steelers do defy the odds and dress Joshua Dobbs alongside the other two quarterbacks, let’s hope that there’s no cause for QB number 2 to throw a pass outside of garbage time.

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Can We Count on Chase Claypool? Here’s What Steelers Rookie Wide Receiver Playoff Statistics Suggests

The Pittsburgh Steelers are banking big time on rookie wide receiver Chase Claypool in the playoffs. Mike Tomlin makes no bones about it. After the Steelers narrow loss to Cleveland, Tomlin declared:

It was our intention to feature him a little bit today. We wanted him to have that type of rhythm and that type of confidence in his playmaking ability going into January ball. We were able to check that box.

The Steelers plan appears to be working. After breaking records in September, and October, Chase Claypool’s numbers began to drop in November. During the Steelers 3 game December losing streak, the rookie who’d scored 4 touchdowns in 1 game against the Eagles had all but disappeared from the Steelers offense.

Before the Browns game, Randy Fictchner talked openly about hitting the “Rookie Wall” explaining:

It always seems to happen about that time when your normal college season would be over. About 11, 12 games, that’s what you’re used to. That is what their bodies are used to. I won’t say that he hit that wall, but I will say there’s something there that you have to work yourself through. I saw it, you can see it.

Mike Tomlin declined to admit that Claypool had hit the rookie wall, but conceded that coaches had been trying to help him avoid hitting that wall by limiting his snaps. Claypool’s explosive performances against the Colts and Browns show that the Steelers plans paid big dividends in the at the tail end of the 2020 regular season.?

Chase Claypool, Steelers vs Eagles

Chase Claypool scores a 2nd quarter touchdown vs the Eagles. Photo Credit: Chaz Palla, Tribune Reivew

  • Now the challenge for Claypool and the Steelers make sure his late season surge carries over into the playoffs.

Playoff history of past Steelers rookie wide receivers suggests this will be difficult….

History of Steelers Rookie Wide Receivers in the Playoffs

The playoffs are different breed of NFL game. If memory serves, Hines Ward once likened the difference in intensity between the playoffs and regular season to the difference between the regular season and preseason.

  • That makes production in the playoffs particularly difficult for rookies.

To wit, at least 4 Steelers wide receivers have won Super Bowl rings as rookies – but you wouldn’t know it from their playoff statistics.

Numbers don’t lie. The prospects for Pittsburgh’s plans for Claypool don’t look bright.

Here you’ve got playoff statistics from 20 Steelers rookie wide receivers drawn from 41 games over a 43 years period. Passes were thrown from Hall of Famers like Terry Bradshaw and Ben Roethlisberger to “How was he a first rounder?” Mark Malone, to middle of the roaders like Neil O’Donnell, Kordell Stewart and yes, Bubby Brister.

Steelers rookie wide receivers playoff statistics

Based on those averages, if the Steelers were to play in two playoff games, Chase Claypool can be expected to catch between 3-4 passes for just under 50 total yards with his longest reception clocking in at 13 yards and his chances scoring a touchdown are minimal.

Ah. While numbers may not lie – Derek Hill and Charles Johnson’s rookie playoff campaigns foreshadowed future disappointment – statistics often fall short of telling the complete truth.

Times When Statistics Fail to Tell the Full Story

While Lynn Swann’s playoff rookie playoff contributions were pretty good, you’d never guess that John Stallworth was ALSO a future Hall of Famer if his rookie playoff stats were all you had to go by. On the flip side, Mark Stock logged 4 catches for 74 yards for the 1989 Steelers. Even if you can forgive his critical drop in the playoff loss to the Broncos, the rookie’s future looked bright.

  • Not only did Stock never play another down for the Steelers, he didn’t catch another NFL pass until 1993 when he was with the then Washington Redskins.
Antonio Brown, Steelers vs Ravens

Antonio Brown catches with his helmet. Photo Credit: Behind the Steel Curtain

Sammie Coates is another player who enjoyed a false flash in the playoffs. He looked good in the Steelers playoff loss to the Broncos in 2015 but a year later he was dropping would-be game changers in the AFC Championship loss to the Patriots.

  • And sometimes quantity of catches tells us nothing about the quality of the catches.

Nate Washington converted a critical 3rd down on the Steelers first scoring drive against the Broncos in the 2005 AFC Championship – and then kept Domonique Foxworth from intercepting a few plays latter. Likewise, Antonio Brown’s 5 catches for 90 yards look pretty good for a rookie in 2010.

However, “pretty good” fails to communicate the reality that Brown made the most critical catches in the Steelers divisional win over the Ravens and then again in the AFC Championship win over the Jets.

Lipps and Randel El Pen Positive Precedent for Claypool

There are of course two Steelers rookies who followed strong regular seasons who continued their success in the playoffs. Louis Lipps had 45 catches for 860 yards and 9 touchdowns as a rookie for the 1984 Steelers and then went on to make 8 catches for 131 yards in the ’84 Steelers two playoff games.

As a rookie Antwaan Randle El had 47 catches for 489 yards and 2 touchdowns, and in the playoffs he had 9 catches for 138 yards – in addition to his 99 yard kickoff return for a touchdown the 2002 Steelers Wild Card win over the Browns.

The best part? Both Randle El and Louis Lipps, like Chase Claypool were Joe Greene Great Performance Award  aka Steelers Rookie of the Year winners. Here’s hoping Claypool follows the post season footsteps of Lipps and Randle El.

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Blame JuJu? If Steelers Go One & Done vs Browns “They” Will Say “Its All Smith-Schuster’s Fault”

The Steelers are set to take on the Browns in an AFC wildcard game at Heinz Field on Sunday night, but if you think Cleveland is in trouble thanks to several players and head coach Kevin Stefanski being placed on the COVID list, guess again.

  • Pittsburgh is the squad in serious jeopardy of going one and done. Again.

Why?

JuJu Smith-Schuster, Steelers vs Saints, JuJu Smith-Schuster fumble

Two years ago JuJu Smith-Schuster’s fumble doomed the Steelers. This time it could be his mouth. Photo Credit: Butch Dill, AP via Tribune Review

While speaking virtually with the media during the week, Steelers receiver JuJu Smith-Schuster infected his squad with something even worse than COVID; he plagued Pittsburgh with negative bulletin board material that the Browns will surely use as an elixir to cure what ails them ahead of their first postseason game in 18 years.

“Nah, I think they’re still the same Browns that I’ve played every year,” Smith-Schuster said in a quote courtesy of CBS Sports.com. “I think they’re nameless gray faces. They have a couple of good players on their team. But at the end of the day … the Browns are the Browns. It’s AFC North football. They’re a good team. I’m just happy we’re playing them again.”

  • Ouch…if you believe in such things.
  • I don’t, of course.

Believing in bulletin board material is cute and all, but I don’t think it has any effect on the outcome of a game. Oh, sure, players and coaches might say it gave them extra motivation after a win, but what about all those times a team has lost despite going into a game equipped with bulletin board material?

Funny how bulletin board material is never mentioned after a loss. I guess that’s because the team that didn’t shut up, put up.

  • Either that, or it’s because bulletin board material doesn’t mean squat.

Unfortunately, it doesn’t matter what I think about bulletin board material, because if the clock strikes midnight on the Steelers’ 2020 season this Sunday evening at Heinz Field, the fans and media will have a convenient scapegoat to blame: JuJu’s mouth.

Just like with head coach Mike Tomlin’s interview with Tony Dungy back in 2017 where he mentioned a possible postseason rematch with the Patriots weeks before he knew he’d have to win a rematch with the Jaguars before even facing New England, folks will point to Smith-Schuster’s comments as the reason Pittsburgh lost to the Browns.

If you talk to someone during the offseason, they’ll bring up Smith-Schuster’s virtual press conference. If you listen to sports talk radio next summer ahead of the Steelers reporting to St. Vincents College for training camp (hopefully), they’ll cite Pittsburgh’s lack of focus and lack of respect for the Browns as to why the franchise came up short in the previous postseason.

Again, I think it’s silly, but it’s low-hanging fruit for the media and the masses, and it’s easy to blame intangibles such as quotes and a player’s social media activity than it is to acknowledge that the opposing team was just better on a certain day.

The Steelers and Browns have spent hours preparing for Sunday’s postseason clash, and to think, the outcome could actually be decided by JuJu Smith-Schuster’s perceived lack of respect for the Browns.

Unless the Steelers win, of course.

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Browns Beat Steelers 24-22, but Pittsburgh Still Takes Positives into Playoff Rematch

The Pittsburgh Steelers closed their 2020 season with a last-minute 24-22 loss to the Cleveland Browns. The loss left the Steelers regular season record at 12-4 and sent the Browns to the playoffs.

  • As a franchise, the Steelers subscribe to the philosophy that nothing good comes from losing.

Throughout his tenure, Mike Tomlin has refused to claim “moral victories” even if they may have been justified. Nonetheless, there are some definite positives Pittsburgh can pull out of this loss heading into the playoffs.

Chase Claypool, Steelers vs Browns

Chase Claypool scores a 4th quarter touchdown on fourth down. Photo Credit: Caitlyn Epes, Steelers.com

First 45 Minutes Evolve as Expected

The storylines were set heading into this game. For the Steelers very little was at stake. Cleveland, in contrast was playing for all of the marbles, as a win meant the playoffs, but a loss would keep them out. Knowing that, Mike Tomlin opted to “Air Mail” his players to playoffs, keeping Ben Roethlisberger, Cam Heyward, T.J. Watt, Maurkice Pouncey, Terrell Edmunds and Chris Boswell out.

Oliver Veron, Mason Rudolph, Steelers vs Browns

Oliver Veron sacks Mason Rudolph. Photo Credit: Chaz Palla, Tribune-Review

Playing against a team fighting for its post-season life, the game evolved pretty much as you’d expect it to for the first 45 minutes.

  • Nick Chubb gouged the Steelers for a 47–yard touchdown run
  • The Steelers offense was limited to 3 Matthew Wright field goals
  • Mason Rudolph threw and ugly interception that the Browns quickly converted into a touchdown

The Cleveland Browns touchdown came on the first play of the 4th quarter, which gave them a 26 to 9 lead. At that point, with 15 minutes separating the Steelers from a playoff rematch, the smart money says pull the remaining starters and hope to avoid injury.

But Mike Tomlin chose to live in his hopes and not his fears.

Steelers Play to Win

Mike Tomlin once declared, “As long as we’re keeping score, I play to win.” It’s one thing for a coach to state such a credo; it is an entirely different thing for players to meet the challenge. The scoreboard says the Steelers didn’t meet the challenge, but they certainly didn’t flinch.

James Conner, Steelers vs Browns

James Conner rushes for tough yards. Photo Credit: Chaz Palla, Tribune-Review

On the ensuring drive:

Next the defense got into the act. One of the keys to the Browns’ second half success was Baker Mayfield’s scrambling. But on 3rd and 3, Stephon Tuitt stepped up and sacked Mayfield, setting up a 4th and 7. The Browns went for it, but came up short.

On the next drive Mason Rudolph did it again, lighting up the Browns with a 47 yard completion to Diontae Johnson. A six yard run by Anthony McFarland and a 2 yard shovel pass from Joshua Dobbs to Vance McDonald set up Mason Rudolph’s 2 yard touchdown to JuJu Smith-Schuster, narrowing the score to 24-22.

The Steelers failed on the two point conversion. Just as their on sides kick failed. Just as the Steelers defense failed to keep the Browns from running out the clock.

Positive Take Aways from Pittsburgh

As Mike Tomlin declared following the game, the Steelers simply “didn’t make enough plays” to win. However, there were any number of positives that Pittsburgh can pick out of this game:

  • Alex Highsmith had another strong game, including a sack that scuttled Cleveland’s two minute drill
  • The Steelers contained Cleveland’s rushing attack
  • Pittsburgh’s rushing attack showed signs of life
  • Vance McDonald affirmed he can be a threat in the passing game
  • The Steelers played with intensity

Some of the take aways above might raise an eyebrow at first glance. Even if you take away 47 yard run, he still had a 4.7 yard average. While that’s not an average the Steelers can allow in the playoffs, his remaining 61 yards and Kareem Hunt’s 3.7 suggest that the Steelers can contain Cleveland’s running game.

Pittsburgh’s own running game hardly authored anything to write home about, but each of the running backs showed they can make plays when holes are there.

And what’s most encouraging about this game is that the Steelers played with an intensity that suggested that they were fighting for a playoff spot — which is exactly attitude this team needs.

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#ICYMI: Steelers Just Schooled Browns on How Respect is Earned in the NFL

Before the Steelers set foot in Nissan Stadium to take on the Titans in a battle of unbeatens last Sunday, many wondered just how credible of a contender Pittsburgh was.

The Steelers’ first five victories came against teams that were either suspect–the Giants, Broncos, Texans and Eagles — or the Browns.

However, thanks to a 27-24 victory over Tennessee, the Steelers are now not only the lone undefeated team in the NFL heading into Week 8, but they’re also legit for real.

  • That’s how you earn respect in the NFL.
Bud Dupree, T.J. Watt, Baker Mayfield, Steelers vs Browns

Bud Dupree sacks T.J. Watt. Photo Credit: Joe Sargent/Getty Images, via WJAC.com

If you’re a Browns fan or supporter who is reading this, I want you to heed these words: You don’t earn respect by saying you want it or by your supporters insisting on it. You don’t gain respect by being on Hard Knocks and gaining many sympathetic fans that way. You don’t earn respect by being glib and/or disrespectful with reporters–I’m talking to you, Baker Mayfield.

You don’t earn respect through offseason rankings and/or predictions. You don’t gain respect by beating your rival and its backup quarterback. You don’t earn respect by beating that backup quarterback over the head with his own helmet — I’m talking to you, Myles Garrett.

  • You gain respect by beating your rival with its franchise quarterback and then doing it again and again.

Many people may not even remember this, but Cleveland went into M&T Bank Stadium early in the 2019 season and beat up the Ravens pretty good. You might say it was a bit of a statement game for the Browns, if not for the fact that nobody remembers it. Why? Because Cleveland then went out and lost four-straight games to the 49ers, Seahawks, Patriots and Broncos, respectively.

OK, if you wanted to be fair, you could say the Browns were a young team, still searching for answers. Maybe the true answers came in the form of a 21-7 victory over the Steelers in the infamous Body Bag game. It was Thursday Night Football. It was nationally televised. It was controversial. Garrett became both a villain and a hero to many at the same time.

  • The Browns were proud of their victory. Their fans were proud of their victory. Even the media was proud of their victory.

The only thing left for the Browns to do was finish the job 17 days later in the rematch at Heinz Field. A victory would not only improve the Browns’ record to 6-6, it would also put them in a prime position to earn a playoff spot.

What happened? The Browns, those upstarts, those offseason champions, those Hard Knocks heroes, couldn’t knock off the Steelers and the third-string quarterbackDevlin Hodges — who replaced Mason Rudolph, the backup quarterback who helped to turn Garrett into both a villain and a hero at the same time.

  • The Steelers prevailed, 20-13, and were the ones now sitting in prime playoff position.

As for the Browns. They went on to lose three of their last four–including a rematch against the Ravens at home–to finish the season at 6-10. They had regressed from their 2018 record of 7-8-1.

Fast-forward to 2020, and the Browns are now 5-2 and look to be in great shape to earn a trip to the playoffs for the first time since 2002. Where’s the respect? Where’s the hype?

Maybe those things don’t exist right now because Cleveland’s two losses came against their two biggest rivals–the Ravens and Steelers–and by a combined score of 76-13.

Also, two of the Browns’ victories were against the Bengals — and just barely.

  • Both Pittsburgh and Baltimore showed the Browns what true respect looks like.

Is it any surprise that the Steelers, just one year after barely missing the playoffs without an injured Ben Roethlisberger, are now the only undefeated team in the NFL?

Are you ever truly shocked when Pittsburgh takes on a juggernaut like the Titans and wins?

  • Championship organizations do many things to continue to earn respect.

They don’t just win Super Bowls as the number one or number two seed. They become the first team in NFL history to do it as the number six seed as the Steelers did in Super Bowl XLIII.

The Browns still have a chance to earn respect before 2020 is over. They have one more shot at both Pittsburgh and Baltimore. After that, they’ll likely have a chance to earn some in the postseason.

  • Will they? That remains to be seen, but while they’re busy trying to earn respect, the Steelers are busy trying to win a title.

Maybe that’s the difference between the two teams. Until that changes, no respect will be coming the Brownies’ way.

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Steelers Defeat Browns 38-7, as Pittsburgh Shows Poise while Cleveland Caves

The Steelers defeated the Cleveland Browns 38-7 at Heinz Field to deliver Pittsburgh’s first 5-0 start since 1978. This was the franchises’ biggest regular season clash since the Steelers 27-7 AFC Central clinching win in December 1994. 2020’s edition had all of the makings of a barn burner.

  • Cleveland has an elite rushing offense.
  • Pittsburgh has an elite rushing defense.
  • The Browns seem to score at will on their opening drives.
  • Who remembers the last time the Steelers scored a touchdown on their opening drive?

Instead of a barn burner, the Steelers blew out the Browns for one simple reason: Pittsburgh’s poise was on display throughout the game, Cleveland’s was MIA.

Minkah Fitzpatrick, Steelers vs Browns, Minkah pick six

Minkah Fitzpatrick’s pick six put the Steelers up 10-0 early in the 1st quarter. Photo Credit: Chaz Palla

The Butler Calls It:  Minkah is Just Fine

As if on cue, the Steelers offense marched down the field after a series of strong James Conner runs, reaching the Red Zone only to settle for a Chris Boswell field goal. Another week, another touchdownless opening drive.

  • One of the whispers heard below the radar during the Steelers 4-0 start has been, “Where’s Minkah?“

Minkah Fitzpatrick was a difference maker for the Steelers a year ago; his big plays easily turned the outcome of 2 or 3 games if not more.

Yet, Minkah had kept a low profile thus far in 2020. While that might not be the liability that some suggest, the fact that Minkah’s name hasn’t been mentioned much and the Steelers 3rd down defense has been atrocious are hard to chalk up to coincidence.

Pressured by reporters about Fitzpatrick during the week, Steelers defensive coordinator Keith Butler retorted, “Minkah will be fine.”

Butler was right. On the Brown’s first third down Minkah played Baker Mayfield like a harp, picked off the ball and ran it into the end zone to put Pittsburgh up 10-0.

No Panic Despite Big Ben’s Slow Start

The stat sheet suggests that Ben Roethlisberger had a stellar game, with a 101 passer rating, a 14 for 22 yard completion rate, one touchdown and no interceptions. Ben Roethlisberger did play a good game, but he did anything but start strong.

Chase Claypool streches for the pylon. Photo Credit: Chaz Palla

  • The Browns batted away 3 slant attempts to connect with James Washington, making it look easier each time.

The Steelers next two possessions resulted in quick three and outs, including one that saw Ben Roethlisberger give up a 12-yard sack. With the help of a Devin Bush and Stephon Tuitt sack, the Steelers defense kept the Brown’s honest by forcing punts, but consecutive 3 and outs can demoralize an offense – if they let it.

The Steelers offense declined to do that, and after some chink-and-dink action to JuJu Smith-Schuster and Eric Ebron, Ben Roethlisberger lit it up with a 37 yard pass to Mapletron aka Chase Claypool who set up a 1 yard James Conner touchdown.

Once again, poise instead of panic prevailed for Pittsburgh.

Mayfield Blinks, Roethlisberger Delivers

A 17-0 lead after only 20 minutes of play is hardly a death sentence in the NFL, but it does provide an inflection that separates pretenders from contenders. The Browns responded to their 17 point deficit with:

  • Kareem Hunt getting stuffed by Chris Wormley and Vince Williams for no gain.
  • A holding penalty.
  • An ill-advised pass induced by a Stephon Tuitt pressure that forced a Cam Sutton interception

Less than two plays later Ben Roethlisberger found James Washington deep for a 28 yard touchdown hook up.

Second Half – Cleveland Crumbles, Pittsburgh Rumbles

Credit Cleveland for tacking on a touchdown before the half. The Browns got the ball back to start the 2nd half. A long, workman like touchdown drive was all that separated them from making it a 10 point game.

  • Instead, their first drive netted -16 yards thanks to a Bud Dupree sack and a Stephon Tuitt forced fumble

Randy Fichtner’s offense couldn’t do much with its first chance of the half. Cleveland got the ball back, won a replay challenge, and faced a 4th and 1 at their own 29. This time T.J. Watt and Cam Heyward stoned Kareem Hunt for a 1-yard loss.

While they only had 28 yards to go, the Steelers managed to milk 5 minutes off of the clock as they converted their takeover on downs into another touchdown with a 3 yard Chase Claypool run.

Pittsburgh’s Poise Carries Steelers to 5-0

Claypool’s touchdown run put the Steelers up 31 to 7 effectively ending the game as the third quarter drew to a close. But Pittsburgh’s poise, and Cleveland lack of it continued to shine brightly through the 4th quarter action:

  • Two more times the Browns would test Pittsburgh on 4th down…
  • …and two more times the Steelers would win the battle of wills
  • Kevin Stefanski pulled Baker Mayfield, as a matter of prudence rather than panic, but pull him he did

And then there’s this:

Pittsburgh’s poise was present on many other occasions against the Browns. Joe Haden hadn’t had the strongest start to his season, yet he stepped up to make several plays. Benny Snell showed he can be a sure handed closer, in defending late leads.

The day’s most ominous moment came in the late in the first half when Devin Bush left the game with an injury that Mike Tomlin declared as “significant,” which is likely an ACL tear that will end his season. Yet, Pittsburgh maintained its poise as Robert Spillane did an admirable job answering the “Next man up” call.

  • CBS chose the Steelers-Browns game as its marquee matchup of the week.

We understand why. Both teams arrived at Heinz Field with 4 wins. Only one would leave with 5. On his first day in Pittsburgh, Mike Tomlin postulated that sometimes the biggest test isn’t how you handle failure, but how you handel success.

The 2020 season is still young, but thus far Pittsburgh is passing that test with flying colors. Cleveland? Not so much. And that’s why the Steelers are 5-0.

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Myles Garrett Suspension Lifted. Assault with a Weapon Only Costs You Six Games in Goodell’s NFL

Roger Goodell strikes again. The NFL has lifted its “indefinite” suspension of Myles Garrett, clearing the way for the defensive end from the Cleveland Browns to participate in all off season activities, and play in 2020.

When last we saw him, at the tail end of the infamous Steelers-Browns Body Bag Game, Myles Garrett was ripping off Mason Rudolph’s helmet and then bashing him in the head with it. When last we heard from Myles Garrett, he attempted to justify his attack on Mason Rudolph, charging that Rudolph had provoked him by uttering a racial epitaph.

However there is zero audio evidence to support Myles Garrett’s accusation, suggesting he was simply trying to cover up his crime.

Mason Rudolph, Myles Garrett, David DeCastro, Myles Garrett attacks Mason Rudolph helmet

Myles Garrett attacks Mason Rudolph with his helmet. Photo Credit: Jason Miller, Getty Images via Slate.com

Credit Goodell and/or the NFL’s discipline regime for understanding how to play the PR game.

They lifted Myles Garrett’s suspension less than two weeks after the Super Bowl and before the NFL combine at a time when many writers are taking off and, more importantly, when fans are highly disengaged.

  • The outrage that should follow such and injustice is largely absent.

But make no mistake about it, lifting Myles Garrett’s suspension is an injustice, and further serves to show just how arbitrary things are in Roger Goodell’s Kangaroo Count. At the end of the day “indefinite” equals 6 games for Garrett. Let’s add some context around that number.

  • In October 2018, Goodell suspended Mychal Kendricks for 8 games for insider trading
  • In June 2018, Goodell suspended Roy Miller 6 games for undisclosed reasons
  • In September 2017, Goodell suspended Josh Brown for 6 games after a domestic violence incident
  • In August 2017, Goodell suspended Ezekiel Elliott for 6 games after a domestic violence incident

A decade ago, in Pittsburgh, Goodell suspended Ben Roethlisberger for 6 games after his involvement in an incident involving a young woman in a bathroom bar in Midgeville, Georgia. The local district attorney investigated but declined to even take the case to a grand jury.

I strongly condemn domestic violence and fully agree that the league should punish these acts and further urge the women involved to press charges. Insider trading is also a crime worthy of punishment. And I’m not inclined to walk back one word of the harsh criticism leveled at Ben Roethlisberger during the Midgeville incident.

Even if Ben Roethlisberger committed no crime, he had no business doing what we know he did.

  • But how does these acts compare to what Myles Garrett did? The answer is, they don’t.

By ripping Rudolph’s helmet off and hitting him in the head with it, Myles Garrett committed assault with a deadly weapon. Had this incident occurred outside a bar in “The Flats” of Cleveland and had there been video of doing the same thing with a motorcycle helmet, and attempted murder charge would not be out of the question.

  • Fortunately, Myles Garrett committed his crime on an NFL football field governed by Roger Goodell’s warped standards of justice.

On Goodell’s football fields assault with a deadly weapon apparently only costs you 6 games.

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Bilingual or Not, Myles Garrett Masters Art of “Tirar y después esconder la mano.”

After Myles Garrett attempted to maim Mason Rudolph at the end of the “Body Bag Game” a host of Cleveland commentators rushed to contrast Garrett’s assault with a deadly weapon and his character.

Mason Rudolph, Myles Garrett, David DeCastro, Myles Garrett attacks Mason Rudolph helmet

Myles Garrett attacks Mason Rudolph with his helmet. Photo Credit: Jason Miller, Getty Images via Slate.com

Steel City Insider’s  Jim Wexell perhaps put it best:

Listening to Cleveland-area reporters telling me how nice of a guy Garrett is, and how well he treats his dog, made me think of reporters interviewing neighbors of mass murderers.

We’ve read about how Myles Garrett writes poetry and aspires to be a paleontologist when he retires from the game. There’s been no word on whether or not he is bilingual. But even if he isn’t fluent in Spanish, he’s master the art of:

Tirar y después esconder la mano.”

The statement he leaked after learning this his appeal of his indefinite suspension illustrates this perfectly:

To those of you who are not bilingual the phrase “Tirar y después esconder la mano” literally means “To throw, and then hide your hand.” The meaning isn’t literal however, it refers to someone who says something, and then tries to pretend they really didn’t mean it the way you understood it, when in fact the meant exactly what they were saying.

  • This is exactly what Myles Garrett is trying to do.

He’s not denying he made the accusation. But he’s trying to distance himself from the implications of his very words. His second sentence reveals all:

This was not meant for public dissemination, nor was it a convenient attempt to justify my actions or restore my image in the eyes of those I disappointed.

Isn’t that grand! Let’s take this apart piece by piece.

This was not meant for public dissemination.”

Is there ANYONE naïve enough to actually believe this? Would even the most hardened Myles Garrett apologist accept this at face value? Let’s begin with the fact that the number of people who heard Myles Garrett say this is finite. The number of people with access to the notes of minutes of the appeal hearing is larger, but the circle remains small.

Steel Curtain Rising has ZERO access to sources on this, but whoever leaked this is either obviously sympathetic to Myles Garrett or really wants to hurt Mason Rudolph.

Everything leaks out of the league office. He need look no farther than all of the leaks about failed drug tests. If Myles Garrett is as smart as everyone says he is, he knew full well that someone would leak this.

(And this presumes that it Myles Garrett’s agent isn’t the source of the leak.)

“…nor was it a convenient attempt to justify my actions…”

Really? It wasn’t? Then why say it?

Seriously. If Myles Garrett really accepts that attempting an action on the football field that would carry criminal assault charges if it occurred in the parking lot is not acceptable under any circumstances, then why make an accusation which many people were ALREADY arguing was mitigating, if not justifying circumstance.

“…or restore my image in the eyes of those I disappointed.”

Hum. Funny how Myles Garrett would insist on denying that this was one of the reasons why he charged Mason Rudolph of provoking him with a racial slur. I mean, he never thought the accusation was ever going to become public, so why would he worry about how “those I disappointed” would react to it?

The last 8 seconds of the Body Bag Game have generated a lot of sound and fury. But the fundamental facts remain the same:

  • Myles Garrett hit Mason Rudolph late
  • Contact might have been inevitable, but taking Mason Rudolph to the ground was not
  • Mason Rudolph did grab Myles Garrett’s helmet
  • Myles Garrett picked Mason Rudolph up by the helmet and twisted it off
  • David DeCastro tried to separate them
  • Mason Rudolph perused Myles Garrett – he did not, however physical strike him
  • Myles Garrett committed assault with a deadly weapon against Mason Rudolph when
  • Mason Rudolph has said he did nothing to escalate the shuffle

And now we can add one more fact, Myles Garrett has openly accused Mason Rudolph of provoking him by uttering a racial slur in a public effort to justify his actions and have his suspension reduced while branding Rudolph as a racist.

  • Except, if you listen to Myles Garrett, he didn’t intend to do any of those things.

We started by invoking the Latin American slang phrase “Tirar y después esconder la mano.” We’ll close by paraphrasing the words of William Shakespeare as spoken by Queen Gertrude in HamletThe defensive end doth protest too much, methinks.”

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