In Defense of “The Steelers Way”

The Steelers Way” is under attack, and it is time to defend it. No defense should be necessary. But if social media offers any guide, it is. Site scribe Tony Defeo has already offered a vigorous defense of Mike Tomlin, but the implicit criticism the Steelers are weathering from a good portion of their fan base goes beyond Tomlin.

Paul Zeise of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette highlights the issue perfectly. In responding to a fan asking about why some regard Mike Tomlin as irreplaceable, Zeise remarks:

Tomlin supporters demand to know who the Steelers could get that is better, and I always say, “How about the next Mike Tomlin or Bill Cowher?” In other words, when those two coaches were hired, nobody really knew who they were. And both won a Super Bowl. The Rams hired an excellent young coach who was an unknown. There are a lot of great coaches out there. You could end up worse off, but you could also be Tampa, Baltimore or Denver who all replaced highly successful coaches with coaches who took the team to Super Bowl titles. There is no law that reads “The next coach will be worse” than the successful coach you fire.

Sounds simple doesn’t it?

Denver and Tampa were on the precipice of a Super Bowl and coaching changes yielded instant Lombardi Trophies. To listen to Zeise , its almost as easy as snapping your fingers, isn’t it?

Except it’s not.

And rather than bemoan Art Rooney II’s steady hand, Steelers fans should give thanks for the fact that Art Rooney II, like his father before him, is guided by the Rooney rule. No, we’re not talking about the NFL’s Rooney Rule, but rather the one that has guided the franchise since 1969 and his best enunciated by Mike Silverstein, aka “Homer J” from Going Deep with the Steelers:

  • You find the best guy you can to coach the team, and you stick with him as long as you can.

Since the wanning days of the Lyndon Johnson administration, just 3 men, Chuck Noll, Bill Cowher and Mike Tomlin have carried the title of “Head Coach, Pittsburgh Steelers.” That’s a record of not even remotely matched not only in the NFL, but in all of North American major league sports.

  • It’s also not a coincidence that the Pittsburgh Steelers are also the only team to own 6 Lombardi Trophies.
Bill Cowher, Mike Tomlin, Chuck Noll, Steelers Six Lombardi Trophies, Mike Tomlin Bill Cowher photo

Bill Cowher interviews Mike Tomlin. Photo Credit: Steelers.com

Coaching a team to a Super Bowl victory is not easy. Doug Peterson deserves every bit of credit heaped upon him for leading the Eagles to a Super Bowl win over the Patriots, but no one should be fooled into thinking that finding the next Doug Peterson should be easy.

Consider this, from Chuck Noll’s first post-Super Bowl era losing season in 1985 to his retirement, precisely one Super Bowl was one by a coach who was hired during that time span. And that was George Siefert, who inherited a Super Bowl champion (to be fair, Jimmy Johnson got hired in 1989 and won a Super Bowl in 1992, a year after Noll’s retirement.) There wasn’t as much coaching turnover in the 80’s as there was today, but the number of new coaches hired during that 7 year period could easily approach 2 dozen.

From Bill Cowher’s first losing season in 1998 until his victory in Super Bowl XL only two NFL head coaches were hired who won Super Bowls during that time span, Bill Belichick and Jon Gruden.

  • Is there an up and coming coach out there who could come into Pittsburgh and do a better job than Mike Tomlin?

Yes, possibly there is, just as it’s possible that Bill Cowher could have been replaced by someone better after the dark days of the ’98 and ’99 seasons. But the Pittsburgh Steelers don’t operate that way. They don’t abandon a coach who is a proven winner in favor of a quest for perfect coach.

The Steelers worst finish since 1970 came in 1988 when the team went 5-11; no other NFL franchise has avoided dipping below 5 wins during that time span.

  • That fallout from 1988 campaign illustrates how the Steelers Way works.

Chuck Noll and the Pittsburgh Steelers weren’t the only legendary franchise to suffer hard times in 1988. Tom Landry and the Cowboys finished 3-13 (in fact, one of Noll’s wins came and Landry’s expense). Bum Bright responded by selling the team to Jerry Jones, who hired Jimmy Johnson as coach even before he had the decency to fire Tom Landry.

Dan Rooney responded differently. He pressured Noll to make changes, Noll resisted and almost resigned. But Noll returned, had another blaze of glory with the 1989 Steelers and retired two years later.

  • That gives you a good contrast between “The Steelers Way” and the rest of the NFL’s way.

And let’s be clear about something: since that fateful juncture, the Dallas Cowboys actually have won 3 Super Bowls to the Pittsburgh Steelers 2, including a win over Bill Cowher in Super Bowl XXX.

But the Steelers have also made it to the Big Dance 4 times, have been to more conference championships, had more playoff wins, have only suffered 4 losing seasons, and have overall been a more consistent winner.

That’s “Steelers Way,” in action and I’ll take that over any other NFL team’s operating philosophies.

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In the End, Pennsylvania Delivers. Eagles Super Bowl Win Preserves Steelers “Sixburgh” Status

The message of Super Bowl LII, for Pittsburgh at least? In the end, count on Pennsylvania to deliver. The Philadelphia Eagles brought the first ever Lombardi Trophy back to the City of Brotherly love with a thrilling 41-33 victory over the New England Patriots that went all the way to the wire.

  • Nick Foles, Jeffery Lurie and all of the Philadelphia fans fully deserve all of the celebration and accolades that come with this win.

The Eagles earned it, they overcame adversity and they never lost faith in themselves even when they were playing their backup quarterback. They humbled the mighty Tom Brady and while they didn’t stop, they contained Gronk. Good for them.

They also did the franchise that sits down on the opposite end of the Pennsylvania Turnpike a bit of a favor by preventing New England from netting its 6 Lombardi and preserving the Steelers status as the only football team to win six Super Bowls.

  • So, for another year at least, Pittsburgh is “Sixburgh” and the Steelers Nation can proudly tease the rest of the NFL, “Got Six?”

That doesn’t make up for the disappointment that was the 2017 season. But its nice to see some of the Steelers records intact, even another franchise has to do the dirty work.

Tom Brady, Brandon Graham, Super Bowl LII

Tom Brady following Brandon Graham’s strip sack in Super Bowl LII. Photo Credit: Matt Stone, Boston Herald

In 2014, the Steelers lost Le’Veon Bell going into the playoffs and the team was not ready. As a result, New England tied Chuck Noll’s record. In 2015, the Steelers reached the divisional round without DeAngelo Williams, Antonio Brown and with a less than 100% Ben Roethlisberger. The Broncos stopped the Patriots anyway, but one has to wonder if Pittsburgh would have been up to the task.

Last year the 2016 Steelers Super Bowl run petered out in the AFC Championship, as Steelers again lost Bell early on, while Martavis Bryant was out suspended and JuJu Smith-Schuster was yet to be drafted.

  • The Pittsburgh Steelers were of course the first team to win 3, 4 and 6 Super Bowls.

The franchise was good at setting those records, but not so good at defending them. Even with Hall of Famers  like Rod Woodson and Dermontti Dawson, the likes of Bubby Brister, Louis Lipps and Merril Hoge weren’t going to stop the 49ers from getting to 4 in the 80’s.

And of course the 1994 Steelers blew their chance to face off against the 49ers in the Super Bowl, and a year later in Super Bowl XXX Neil O’Donnell to Larry Brown paved the way for Dallas, not Pittsburgh to reach 5 Super Bowls first.

So be it. You always prefer to count on yourselves and never on another team to defend franchise honor. The Seahawks came up short, and the Falcons folded in the 4th last year. But our fellow Pennsylvanians the Philadelphia Eagles delivered. Thank You Philly.

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Its Pittsburgh “Pennsylvania” After All – Steelers Fans Must Support Eagles in Super Bowl

Super Bowl LII is here and must to the frustration of Steelers Nation, the Steelers will be not only be watching from home, but our beloved Black and Gold finished a step further away from the Big Dance than it did a year ago.

  • Yet, Pittsburgh’s quest to bring Lombardi Number 7 might be on hold, but Pennsylvania still has a skin in the game.

As you well know, the Philadelphia Eagles are set to play the New England Patriots today in the Super Bowl in a match up that no one predicted, at least not since Carton Wentz tore his ACL just a month before the playoffs.

Steelers fans Eagles fans, Steelers support Eagles in Super Bowl

Eagles defensive end takes a selfie with Steelers fans. Photo Credit: Wall Street Journal

Despite being relatively close, there has never really seemed to be much affinity, at least in terms of sports loyalties, between the two cities and their respective fan bases. In contrast, Cincinnatians did tend to root for the Browns until the Bengals arrived, and at least when I lived there in 1996 there were stories of pockets of Browns support  lingering into the 80’s and 90’s.

Shifting focus to the South while Washingtonians readily adopted the Baltimore Orioles during the 70’s, 80’s and 90’s, Baltimoreans, to their credit, remained outright hostile to the Redskins after Colts departure through the Ravens arrival. Yet, in DC during the Raven’s ’00 Super Bowl run, you saw little Ravens decals pop up alongside big GO Skins bumper stickers. Go figure.

Even from as far as away as Buenos Aires, Argentina I feel confident that the just as few Pittsburghers regard the Eagles as their “second team” as Philadelphians regard the Steelers as their “second team.”

It just doesn’t happen.

Heck, I can remember when the Eagles made it to the Super Bowl in 1980. My first real Super Bowl memory had been Super Bowl XIII which was of course followed by Super Bowl XIV. There I was in the 2nd grade, and the Steelers making the Super Bowl was “normal.” (Little did I know that I’d have to wait until Super Bowl XXX when I was in graduate school.)

Anyway, when Super Bowl XV rolled around my folks (who were not football fans) were rooting for Philadelphia, because well, Philly was from Pennsylvania.

  • But it wasn’t the same, no one could muster the same kinda of for Philly, and the Eagles got trounced by the Raiders.

That was then, this is now. IN the interim, The Steelers have added two more trophies to the case in Super Bowl XL and Super Bowl XLIII while the Patriots have loaded up on 5. That means that one more will allow them to tie the Steelers for the NFL records.

  • And the odds overwhelmingly favor Bill Belichick and Tom Brady getting fitted for a sixth Super Bowl ring on Monday morning.

The Steelers had their chance to defend the franchise’s honor last winter, but came up short in the AFC Championship game, going the way of Le’Veon Bell’s groin injury, a shaky defense, and inability of Ben Roethlisberger and Antonio Brown to carry the passing game with help from Jesse James and a bunch of practice squad players starting behind Brown.

  • So be it. Nick Foles and the Philadelphia Eagles are supreme underdogs, but what Pittsburgher (or descendant of Pittsburghers) isn’t a sucker for an underdog story?

If you’re not yet convinced, then there’s this video from Ed Rendell, from Governor of Pennsylvania and mayor Philadelphia.

Very well said, Ed.

So by all means, its time for Steelers Nation to Twirl the Terrible Towels and get behind the Philadelphia Eagles. Tom Brady and the Patriots might own the Steelers, but if falls to someone else upset New England’s Super Bowl six pack then it might as well be another team from Pennsylvania.

E-A-G-L-E-S! Go Eagles!

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Pittsburghers Support Penguins in Stanley Cup, but Predators Evoke ’95 Steelers Run

As weird as it is to say, when you’re a fan of a very successful sports franchise, it comes with a bit of a burden.

Now, when I say “burden,” I don’t mean it’s a bad thing to watch your favorite team enjoy continued success and be judged by the number of championships it displays in its trophy case. It’s just that, well, your favorite team is judged by the number of titles it wins, which means, as a fan, you expect nothing less than achieving the ultimate victory.

As a Steelers fan, I can attest to this quite well, considering anything less than a championship became unacceptable the moment Chuck Noll led his team to a fourth Lombardi trophy in six years in January of 1980, capping off a decade of dominance in the 1970’s that is perhaps unmatched in professional sports history.

The 21 playoff appearances, 15 division titles, four Super Bowl trips and two Lombardi trophies the organization has achieved since have only reinforced the belief among Steelers fans that, again, anything less than ultimate victory is totally unacceptable.

Penguins vs Predators Stanley Cup

Photo credit: Stamford Advocate

With their team going for its second-straight Stanley Cup, and fifth since 1991, Pittsburgh Penguins fans have certainly taken up residence in the same arena of high expectations as those who root for the Steelers. With their team employing some of the best hockey players on the planet–including Sidney Crosby and Evgeni Malkin–nothing but a Stanley Cup parade is acceptable around  these parts (Mike Sullivan is the team’s fourth head coach since Crosby went to his first Stanley Cup Final back in 2008).

Yes, despite their team playing in its fourth Final in nine years and achieving the ultimate success just one year ago, the fans won’t be feeling anything but sorrow unless the Penguins (currently tied 2-2) win the Cup once again.

But you know whose fan base won’t be feeling anything but joy, regardless of how the Final turns out?

  • The one that belongs to Pittsburgh’s opponents, the Nashville Predators. 

An expansion team who came into the NHL in 1998, the Predators had never won a division title nor advanced past the second round of the playoffs, before entering the 2016/2017 postseason as the last seed in the Western Conference (and, based on overall record, the last seed in the entire NHL playoffs).

When you think of great hockey towns, Nashville certainly never comes to mind. However, after almost doing so last year, the Predators sold out all of their home games at Bridgestone Arena for the 2016/2017 regular season.

Maybe that’s why the Predators, despite their nondescript history, rolled right through the Western Conference playoffs and advanced to their first ever Stanley Cup Final.

  • When hockey season is in full-swing, Nashville is unofficially dubbed “Smashville,” and it appears the Predators southern fans have embraced the image.

I know one thing for sure, the city is absolutely drunk off of hockey, as the fans are experiencing this kind of run for the very first time.

In Game 1 of the Stanley Cup Final, played at Pittsburgh’s Consol Energy Center on May 29, a Predators fan made news by throwing a catfish on the ice (a tradition at Predators home games) and was removed from the arena, before being arrested and charged with several crimes (all the charges have since been dropped).

Jake Guentzel, Penguins vs Predators, 2017 Stanley Cup

Jake Guentzel celebrates goal by Evgeni Malkin. Photo Credit: Gene J. Puskar

Coming into the playoffs with the second most points in the NHL and having to outlast the teams who were first and third in points just to make it to the Eastern Conference Finals, the Penguins are certainly in no mood for shenanigans. Neither are their fans, who are now mocking the love-fest Predators fans are enjoying with their team.

  • Ah, but to be that innocent of a fan once more and enjoy something for the very first time.

That kind of feeling usually only happens once.

It  did for me 22 years ago, when the Steelers defeated the underdog Colts in the AFC Championship Game and advanced to Super Bowl XXX to take on the heavily-favored Dallas Cowboys, winners of two of the previous three Super Bowls.

As a youngster in the 1980’s, the Steelers dominance of the previous decade seemed almost mythical after the legends began to retire one-by-one and were replaced by a far-less talented group of players.

However, as Noll gave way to Bill Cowher, and he rejuvenated the team and brought the magic back to the fan base, you could sense the passion and the hunger once more.

  • I know I was super-hungry for some form of championship-success. And when it finally happened after many years of depressing seasons and excruciating playoff exits, I was simply euphoric.
Neil O'Donnell, Super Bowl XXX

Neil O’Donnell in Super Bowl XXX. Photo Credit: McMillian & Wife

Again, Pittsburgh was a huge underdog, but I didn’t care. I soaked in every minute of the two-week build-up to the Super Bowl. I read every article I could get my hands on. I watched every news report and special dedicated to the Black and Gold.

  • Even though the Steelers infamously came up just short against Dallas thanks to too many Neil O’Donnell to Larry Brown connections, I had the time of my life.

In-fact, other than the euphoria that followed Jerome Bettis, Troy Polamalu, Hines Ward, Joey Porter and Ben Roethlisberger leading the Steelers to their the Super Bowl XL victory in Detroit (the franchise’s first title in 26 years), the Steelers trip to Super Bowl XXX may have been my happiest time as a sports fan.

Sadly, unless the Pirates actually make a World Series appearance before I die (it hasn’t happened since I was seven), I may never get to experience that kind of feeling again.

I gotta tell ya, I’m not sure which fan base I envy more:

  • The one with the previous success and high expectations or the one that is enjoying everything for the very first time.

I do know one thing: While Penguins fans won’t truly enjoy themselves unless their team wins another Cup, Predators fans are already at the party and having a grand old time.

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Thoughts on Mike Tomlin, Lawrence Timmons and Steelers Head Coaches First Draft Picks

Lawrence Timmons decision to sign with the Miami Dolphins marked a sad day in Steelers Nation. For ten years Lawrence Timmons had been a mainstay of the Steelers defense, first giving Dick LeBeau and the Keith Butler a durable, reliable presence in the middle of the field.

  • Lawrence Timmons had also been Mike Tomlin’s first draft pick.

Commentators were quick to assert that a head coach losing his maiden draft selection to the free agent market means something, and it does, but just what does it actually mean?

Lawrence Timmons, James Farrior, Ryan Clark, Brett Swain, Super Bowl XLV

Lawrence Timmons goes for a loose ball in Super Bowl XLV. Photo Credit: Streeter Lecka, Getty Images via Zimbio

It sounds sexy to say that a new head coach defines his legacy with his first draft pick and sometimes it’s true. Jimmy Johnson certainly defined his legacy in Dallas for the better by picking Troy Aikman just as Norv Turner did the opposite by picking Heath Shuler.

  • But in other cases the analogy falls flat.

Does anyone really want to try to argue that Bill Walsh in any way defined his legacy in San Francisco by picking making James Owens his first pick in 1979?

Which brings us to the question – how, and to what extent does Lawrence Timmons define Mike Tomlin’s legacy in Pittsburgh?

Steelers Head Coaches & Their First Picks

Steelers history gives a mixed bag when it comes to head coaches and their first picks. And this is a lot more difficult discussion to have in Pittsburgh than say in Cleveland or Washington, as the Steelers have only had 3 head coaches since the end of the Lyndon Johnson administration.

Buddy Parker’s first picks was Len Dawson, which is painfully appropriate for his legacy. Dawson is one of various quarterbacks the Steelers brought into the league that won Super Bowls and/or NFL Championships for someone other than Pittsburgh.

Bill Austin’s first pick ever was a fullback by the name of Dick Leftridge who played all of one season and had a total of 8 yards rushing and got cut the next summer for show up overweight.

Some have suggested that Dick Leftridge could have been a victim of Bill Austin’s racism, while another source consulted to verify this argues that Leftride did in fact lack  the commitment to conditioning. Either way Austin’s pick of Leftridge was certainly indicative of the Steelers failure with the draft.

Joe Greene, Chuck Noll, Art Rooney Sr.

Chuck Noll and Joe Greene Shake hands in front of Art Rooney Sr. in 1982. Photo Credit: Pittsburgh Post-Gazette

On the flip side, picking Joe Greene first most certainly defined Chuck Noll’s legacy as Joe Greene’s arrival in Pittsburgh was the fulcrum that turned a perennial loser on to the path to being the greatest football team in the history of the sport.

In contrast, assessing the impact of Bill Cowher’s decision to pick (along with Tom Donahoe) Leon Searcy on The Chin’s legacy is a little more nebulous. To a certain degree, picking Searcy signaled a full-throated embrace of physical, power football that characterized the Cowher years in Pittsburgh.

  • But would anyone ever argue that Leon Searcy was a legacy defining pick?

I daresay the answer is no.

2007 Tomlin Takes Charge, Picks Lawrence Timmons First

The Steelers turned heads in the 2007 NFL Draft when they picked two outside linebackers, Lawrence Timmons and LaMarr Woodley with picks number one and number two. (Yes, the Steelers originally picked Timmons as an outside linebacker.)

Unfortunately, Lawrence Timmons early career doesn’t give opponents of the “Tomlin’s only won with Cowher’s players” nonsense much ammunition. Timmons played very little as a rookie and, while he made impressive contributions in spot duty in 2008, most of those came at outside linebacker in relief of James Harrison. Timmons started in 2009, but the fact that he split time with Keyaron Fox had some fans labeling him a bust.

  • But if Timmons took a few years to find his NFL footing, he exploded in 2010.
Lawrence Timmons, James Harrison, Steelers vs Titans, Bo Scaife

Lawrence Timmons slams Titans Bo Scaife as James Harrison looks on in Pittsburgh’s 2010 win over Tennessee. Photo Credit: New Pittsburgh Courier

And from 2010 onwards, Lawrence Timmons clearly established himself as a Mike Tomlin talent acquisition success story, even if he had a subpar 2011 campaign. As Steel City Insider’s Jim Wexell observed:

Timmons was explosive. And productive. And he played week in and week out. Timmons started the last 111 games (counting postseason) that the Steelers played. In his eight regular seasons as the starter, he averaged 95 tackles, 4 sacks, 5 passes defensed and 1.4 forced fumbles per season.

Mike Tomlin likes to draft his players, especially premium picks, young and the statistics that Jim Wexell cites show just how effective that strategy has been. The Steelers win 8-8 reloading seasons and the “4 seasons between playoff wins” chant were frustrating for sure.

In seminal 2014 article Déjà vu All Over Again , Jim Wexell compared the post-2011 Steelers to the 1998-2000 Steeler teams and argued that the presence of Ben Roethlisberger as opposed to Kordell Stewart under center is what explains Pittsburgh’s ability to keep the franchise’s head above water.

He’s right of course, but quarterbacks can’t carry a team on their own, and Lawrence Timmons steadfast playmaking presence on the Steelers defense during those years was arguably just as important as Roethlisberger’s was to the defense during that time span.

Lawrence Timmons, Thad Lewis, Lawrence Timmons sack Thad Lewis, Steelers vs Browns,

Lawrence Timmons downs Thad Lewis of the Browns in the penultimate play of 2012. Photo Credit: Chaz Palla, Tribune Review

Think back to the Pittsburgh’s 2012 finale. The Steelers limped into the game against the Browns with an 7-8 record and, with the Steelers defending a two touchdown lead late in the fourth quarter, Lawrence Timmons ended the game with dramatic back-to-back sacks.

It was almost as if Timmons was proclaiming to the rest of the league, “Yes, the Steelers are down, but we’re not out.”

Lawrence Timmons and Tomlin’s Legacy

Lawrence Timmons continued to be the Steelers best defender for the next several seasons. By 2014 one could argue that Cameron Heyward had taken over that role, and by 2016 with Cam Heyward out, Ryan Shazier had established himself as Pittsburgh’s Alpha Male on defense.

  • But Lawrence Timmons continued to dominate, as 2016 second half surge proved.

Despite losing its best player, and despite starting rookies Artie Burns, Sean Davis and Javon Hargrave the Steelers defense staged and impressive turn around during the second half of 2016, and Lawrence was a big part of it coming up with two sacks and two interceptions in the last 7 games, followed by his twin sacks to close the win over the Miami Dolphins in the playoffs.

It is just as unfortunate it the game marked Lawrence Timmons final game as a Pittsburgh Steeler. If Mike Tomlin is to reach the Mountain Top again, he’ll have to do it without the Law Dog.

  • In that sense, Lawrence Timmons’ impact on Mike Tomlin’s legacy falls somewhere between that of his predecessors.

Chuck Noll reached the Mountain Top with Joe Greene, and never sniffed it without him. Leon Searcy helped Bill Cowher broach the pinnacle in Super Bowl XXX, but the time The Chin summited in Super Bowl XL Searcy was a distant memory.

Mike Tomlin and Lawrence Timmons might have only reached the Mountain Top once together in Super Bowl XLIII, but Lawrence Timmons did so much to keep the Mountain Top in reach during the rest of his time in Pittsburgh.

And for that, Steelers Nation says, “Thank You Lawrence Timmons.”

Struggling to keep up with Steelers free agency? Click here for our Steelers 2017 Steelers Free Agent tracker and/or click here for all Steelers 2017 free agency focus articles.

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Chin Up Steelers Nation, There’s a Bright Side to the Ben Roethlisberger Retirement Talk. Seriously

As if the frustration of Pittsburgh’s 3rd AFC Championship loss to the Patriots wasn’t enough, Steelers signal caller Ben Roethlisberger dropped another bomb two days after the game. In speaking with 93.7 FM’s “The Fan” Roethlisberger responded this way to a question about how much time he has left to play:

I don’t know. It’s one of those things, I was talking to my wife about it last night and I’ve been talking to my agent about it and coach about it. I’m going to take this offseason to evaluate it, to consider all options, to consider health, family and things like that and just kind of take some time away to evaluate next season — if there’s going to be a next season — all those things. At that point and age of my career, I think that’s the prudent and smart thing to do every year.

Steeler head coach Mike Tomlin confirmed that he’s had these types of conversations with Ben Roethlisberger in the past, and Dale Lolley has gotten confirmation from one of his teammates as well.

  • It says here that the Ben Roethlisberger retirement talk remains a bit premature and that he’ll be back for in 2017.
Ben Roethlisberger, Ben Roethlisberger retirement, Ben Roethlisberger retirement rumors

Ben Roethlisberger’s retirement talk actually has a bright side (for him). Photo Credit: Chaz Palla, Tribune Review

He’s too much of a competitor and the Steelers are too close to securing Super Bowl Number 7 for Number 7 to simply walk away. Players like Antonio Brown and Le’Veon Bell give the Steelers the fire power they need to win another Super Bowl. Ben knows that and he’s not going to walk away from it. Not just yet.

But its sobering, if not surprising, nonetheless to start the Steelers 2017 off season hearing your franchise quarterback admit that he’s reached the point where his playing days are in the “year-by-year” phase.

The Bright Side to Ben Roethlisberger’s Retirement Talk

And if the news is a downer for Steelers Nation, there’s a decided bright side to the Ben Roethlisberger retirement talk for Big Ben himself. Unless injuries accelerate his timetable, Roethlisberger’s statement affirms that he’ll leave both the game and the Steelers on his terms and at a time of his own choosing.

  • Who was the last Steelers quarterback that walked away at a time and on terms of his own? Bobby Layne?

Sure, Mike Tomczak and Kordell Stewart returned to Pittsburgh to “retire” as Steelers. In Iron Mike’s case the Steelers gave him access to their press room at Latrobe to make the announcement, but denied him a 1 dollar contract. Kordell Stewart’s “retirement” came in 2012, seven years after his final NFL game and 10 years after he left Pittsburgh.

  • Compared to their predecessors, those two men were relatively lucky.

Terry Bradshaw of course blew out his elbow and barely got more than a grunting acknowledgement from Chuck Noll. Cliff Stoudt bolted to the USFL, only to “Pittsburgh Maulers Fans” sellout Three Rivers Stadium to pelt him with ice balls when returned with the Birmingham Stallions.

Mark Malone started for four seasons in Pittsburgh, but performed so poorly in 1987 that the Steelers traded him for an 8th round draft pick to the San Diego Chargers. Bubby Brister spent his final year in Pittsburgh as a backup, then went on to play for the Eagles, Jets, Broncos and Vikings.

Neil O’Donnell famously boasted that he’d take less money to stay with the Steelers as opposed to going to a losing team. After Super Bowl XXX, O’Donnell went to the 3-13 New York Jets, who became the 1-15 Jets. O’Donnell faired a little better after Bill Parcells took over, but Tuna decided he wasn’t worth the money and cut him. He played for Cincinnati and Tennessee after that, but never started another playoff game.

Tommy Maddox reportedly got into shouting matches with Bill Cowher during his final year as a backup to Ben Roethlisberger, found himself demoted to third string behind Charlie Batch and burned his final bridge with the Steelers by no-showing at the team’s White House ceremony following Super Bowl XL.

Ben Roethlisberger Deserves to Leave on His Own Terms

Steelers fans have been blessed. Terry Bradshaw played for 14 seasons and, although he wasn’t an instant winner, he developed into one of the greatest quarterbacks to ever play. Ben Roethlisberger will return for a 14th season and perhaps one or two more after that.

  • But the day when Roethlisberger hangs it up isn’t too far off on the horizon.

Hopefully Ben Roethlisberger will add a Lombardi Trophy (or two?) before he calls it a career. But even if he doesn’t, he’s earned the right to step down on his terms. Ben Roethlisberger’s retirement will mark a sad day in Steelers Nation, but it the fact that Big Ben will decide should make us appreciate the moment much more.

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Mike Tomlin Bill Cowher Photo Shows Just How Lucky Steelers Nation Is. Now Enjoy the Playoffs

The Mike Tomlin Billy Cowher photo against the backdrop of the Steelers six Lombardi Trophies interspersed with images of Mike Tomlin, Bill Cowher and Chuck Noll offered Steelers Nation a priceless portrait.

After Super Bowl XLIII, Steel Curtain Rising waged a mini-campaign pushing for the Steelers to snap an actual photo of Tomlin, Cowher and Noll with the six Lombardi’s back when that was still possible, but based on what we know now, Noll’s health probably wouldn’t have allowed it.

Alas, the picture of Pittsburgh’s 3 coaches with the Steelers Six 6 Lombardi trophies never got taken.

Bill Cowher, Mike Tomlin, Chuck Noll, Steelers Six Lombardi Trophies, Mike Tomlin Bill Cowher photo

Bill Cowher interviews Mike Tomlin. Photo Credit: Steelers.com

Yet this single, powerful image conveys the legacy of excellence that defines this franchise.

The Mike Tomlin Bill Cowher photo should also serves another purpose: It reminds Steelers Nation just how lucky we are.

Cowher-Tomlin Transition Resulted in a Decade of Excellence

History doesn’t always lend itself to symmetry, but when it does it makes an occasion a little extra special.

Exactly 10 years to the day after he resigned as Steelers head coach, Bill Cowher returned to Pittsburgh to interview Mike Tomlin ahead of the Steelers AFC Wild Card game vs. the Miami Dolphins. Here’s what has happened since The Chin stepped down:

  • The Steelers have never ended a season with the L’s outnumbering the W’s
  • 7 of those seasons have produced playoff teams
  • 4 of those seasons have resulted in AFC North Championships
  • 2 Lamar Hunt AFC Championship trophies have been added to the case
  • 1 Super Bowl Championship, a record 6th for the franchise, found its home in Pittsburgh

Some will write off this record by insisting “Tomlin has only won with Cowher’s players.” This site has already debunked Colin Cowherd and Jason Whitlock’s tired nonsense. In the pressure cooker that is the NFL, a medicore coach can only ride the coattails of a successful predecessor for a very short time.

  • Barry Switzer would serve as exhibit A, and Mike Martz (nod to Jim Wexell) gives us exhibit B

Point made. Let’s move on because the Bill Cowher Mike Tomlin photo transcends both of its individual subjects to tell us something about the Pittsburgh Steelers as an organization.

The “Other” Rooney Rule Works, and Works Well

Many saw and still see Mike Tomlin’s hire as a product of “Rooney Rule.” Named after Dan Rooney, the rule requires franchises to interview minorities for head coaching vacancies. Mike Tomlin did get hired because of a Rooney Rule, but one very different from Roger Goodell’s.

As Mike Silverstein, aka “Homer J” on Going Deep with the Steelers, has pointed out time and time again, Dan Rooney’s rule for hiring coaches is pretty straight forward:

  • Hire the best guy, and stick with him as long as you can.

Rooney followed that rule with Chuck Noll. Ten years later he’d added 4 Lombardi Trophies where they’d been none. Ten years removed from his hire date, Bill Cowher had yet to bring home “One for the Thumb” but he was closing in on his 4th AFC Championship game. Cowher lost that AFC Championship game as well as his next, but the Rooney’s stuck with Cowher, and he delivered in Super Bowl XL.

  • Too many Steelers fans don’t quite understand how lucky they are.
Super Bowl XL Lombardi Presentation, Bill Cowher Lombardi Trophy, Dan Rooney, Art Rooney II, Kay Cowher

Bill Cowher stands with Kaye Cowher, Art Rooney II and Dan Rooney on the dias after Super Bowl XL. Photo Credit: Mike Urban, Seattle P-I

In college, I roomed with a New York Jet’s fan, who endured Leon Hess’ firing of Pete Carroll after one season. Hess justified his knee-jerk decision by explaining he was 80 and wanted to win a Super Bowl before he died. Hess replaced Pete Carroll with Rich Kotite.

  • For the record, Rich Kotite went 3-13 and 1-15; Pete Carroll is 103-72 and wears a Super Bowl ring.

During the same time frame, the NFL saw Ted Marchibroda take an Indianapolis Colts team that had been 1-15 in 1991, to the 1995 AFC Championship game. If you’ll remember, quick action in the end zone by Randy Fuller on a Hail Mary was what sent Pittsburgh, and not Indianapolis to Super Bowl XXX.

  • Shortly afterwards, the Irsays thanked Ted Marchibroda for turning the team around by firing him and promoted his offensive coordinator Lindy Infante.

For the record, Infante took the Colts to the playoffs in the next season (where the Steelers clobbered them) and went 3-13 a year after. As my friend observed then, “Aren’t you glad you root for a team where that kind of stuff doesn’t happen?”

The answer then and now is “Yes.” And if you claim to be a Steelers fan yours should be the same.

The Playoffs are Here Steelers Nation, Enjoy Them

In just over 24 hours the Pittsburgh Steelers will host their 12 playoff game at Heinz Field.

While durability is becoming an issue, Ben Roethlisberger is still in his prime and he’s about to start a playoff game for the first time with Antonio Brown and Le’Veon Bell. Players like Eli Rogers, Ladarius Green and Jesse James have stepped up during the 7 game winning streak.

  • Cobi Hamilton and Demarcus Ayers, two guys whose names you probably had to look up during training camp, have also delivered big plays when it has counted.
Pittsburgh Killer Bees, Ben Roethlisberger, Le'Veon Bell, Antonio Brown

Pittsburgh’s Killer B’s, Ben Roethlisberger, Antonio Brown and Le’Veon Bell are set to play their first playoff game. Photo Credit: Gene J. Puskar, AP NY Daily News

Ryan Shazier is about to play his third playoff game. Think back to how he stepped up when all hope was lost last year the playoffs against Cincinnati, and then consider how much he’s grown since then.

Shazier isn’t the only linebacker making impact plays – he’s joined by fellow rookie Bud Dupree, and Lawrence Timmons and James Harrison – two veterans who know how to win Super Bowls. Also keep in mind the growth of rookies like Sean Davis, Javon Hargrave and Artie Burns.

Honestly, after all of that, if you’re a Steelers fan focusing on the draft or free agency, then its time to throw in your Terrible Towel.

  • The Pittsburgh Steelers are a team that is entering the playoffs on a hot streak not unlike 2005 or 2008.

Does this mean Steelers Nation should count Lombardi’s before they hatch? No! There’s a reason why ESPN’s Bill Barnwell (who never likes the Steelers) is only giving Pittsburgh a 4.2% chance to win the Super Bowl.

Take the measure of the 2016 Steelers position-by-position against any number of teams in the 2016 playoffs, and the Steelers probably come up short. But during their 7 game winning streak, players from across the Steelers depth chart have shown an uncanny ability to make plays at critical moments.

  • And that, my friends is a characteristic of champions.

As Chuck Noll always reminded us, it’s about the journey not the destination. But reaching the Mountain Top is a realistic possibility. Enjoy the ride Steelers Nation.

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OK, Steelers Nation, its Time to Put 100 Mike Tomlin Victories into Perspective

“It means I’ve been here for a while.” Those were the exact words of Mike Tomlin whose Pittsburgh Steelers had just beaten the Buffalo Bills 27-20, giving the Steelers their 4th win in a role, ensuring Mike Tomlin’s 10th non-losing season and his 100th victory.

Tomlin’s ho-hum attitude towards winning his 100th NFL game might seem surprising but his “I’ve only had one good season” declaration Ron Cook of the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette adds a little clarity.

  • Of course, Tomlin is referring to the fact that his team has only won one Super Bowl (Super Bowl XLIII) during his 10 seasons in Pittsburgh.

His predecessor Chuck Noll would have defined that attitude as an example of “singleness of purpose.” Bill Cowher was unambiguous about the fact that the only goal for his teams was to win a Super Bowl, going so far as to ask the city of Pittsburgh not to hold a welcome home rally for the team following Super Bowl XXX.

mike tomlin, mike tomlin at st. vincent's in latrobe

Pittsburgh Steelers head coach Mike Tomlin. Photo Credit: Steelers.com

But there’s a certain irony that comes with those two statements from Mike Tomlin, because they show that he shares a sentiment that is pretty much spot-on with regards to how so many Steelers fans feel about his coaching abilities over the years.

  • In other words, nobody seemed to be too impressed (or even notice) Tomlin’s milestone achievement on Sunday.

Nobody, except, well, his players quarterback Ben Roethlisberger, who gave Tomlin  the game ball, after the win over Buffalo on Sunday.

“I gave him a game ball because there’s a lot of coaches in this league that have coached this game and probably wish they had 100 wins,” said Roethlisberger, in a quote courtesy of ESPN.com. “So for him to get it, it’s awesome.”

  • It is really awesome, but if you’re one of Tomlin’s detractors, you probably cite the franchise passer, himself, Roethlisberger, as one of the reasons you’re not very impressed with 100 victories.

If  that’s the case, you’re almost certainly a member of the crowd who thinks Mike Tomlin only won that aforementioned Super Bowl with Bill Cowher’s players. Cowher, of course, was the coach of the team from 1992-2006 and resigned (or, maybe,  retired–that CBS gig is a good one) with a career record of 149-90-1 (regular season).

Putting 100 Mike Tomlin Victories into Perspective

For years, people have been saying Mike Tomlin inherited a Super Bowl team, when he stepped in for Bill Cowher in January of 2007, even if, let’s be  real, he inherited an 8-8 team from the Steelers 2006 campaign.

Tomlin not only inherited an 8-8 team, it was a veteran squad, complete with a team leader in linebacker Joey Porter, who he had to waive for financial reasons, and a Pro Bowl and future Hall of Fame guard in Alan Faneca, who was all kinds of disgruntled over his contract status during the 2007 training camp.

But Mike Tomlin handled both matters in a professional manner and soon made the team his with two-a-day practices and by allowing his coaching  staff–including Dick LeBeau, the legendary and beloved defensive coordinator with a style and philosophy that differed from his–to do its thing.

Mike Tomlin won his Super Bowl in 2008, just two years after being hired, and made it to another one in 2010. But, again, a lot of his players were drafted by Bill Cowher (and Kevin Colbert),  so you weren’t impressed.

But what about his job since 2011, when he had to fire Bruce Arians as offensive coordinator, eventually allow Dick LeBeau to get on with his life’s work, surround his franchise quarterback with a premium offensive line and skill position players that are the envy of the NFL, and rebuild his defense from scratch?

Maybe you’re not impressed, but you should be. In securing his 100th victory in his 10th season, Tomlin joins a group of coaches that include Patriots head man Bill Belichick but not Bill Cowher. For the record, It took Mike Tomlin 157 games to reach 100 wins where as it took Bill Cowher 163 to break the 100 victory mark.

  • Not only has Mike Tomlin never finished with a losing record, he’s never lost his team.
  • We’re talking zero losing seasons and just one regular season finale in-which his team was already eliminated from playoff contention at kickoff.

You might want Mike Tomlin gone as head coach, but then again, there was a time when you wanted Terry Hanratty to start in place of Terry Bradshaw and Scott Campbell to start in place of just about anyone, so, really…it’s one thing to say “fire the coach,” but it’s quite another to replace him.

  • The better the coach, the harder that job becomes.

Fact is (and I’ve said this many times before), a lot of the criticisms levied against Tomlin over the years–always being out-coached in big games, his favoritism toward certain players, clock-management, etc., etc.) were the same that Cowher faced during the majority of his coaching career in Pittsburgh before he finally won Super Bowl XL in his next-to-last season.

  • You might not think that’s true, but if that’s the case, either you’re not from Pittsburgh or you’re simply choosing to ignore the truth.

You want to fire Tomlin?

Good luck finding a successor. Just because the Steelers have only had three head coaches over the past 47 years doesn’t mean they can’t screw up the next hire.

  • When you have someone great in place, you better do your best to make sure he sticks around.

Mike Tomlin is a great head coach, and if you don’t already know that, you never will…..and I have no time to argue with you.

 

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5 Times When Steelers Preseason Troubles Signaled Regular Season Stumbles

The lackluster loss to the Lions started the Steelers 2016 preseason campaign. Steelers Nation is already weighing poor performances from the likes of Alejandro Villanueva and Sammie Coates along with the poor tackling against solid play by the likes of Daryl Richardson, Landry Jones and Doran Grant.

  • Both sides of the discussion will punctuate their arguments with “Its only preseason.”

And rightly so. Steelers preseason results seldom indicate much about the coming regular season, and that’s even when stars like Ben Roethlisberger, Antonio Brown, Le’Veon Bell and DeAngelo Williams are in the game.

But Steelers history also shows us that exceptions do exist. Click below for 5 times when preseason troubles signaled regular season Steelers stumbles.

Pittsburgh Steelers, steelers vs. lions preseason, Shamarko Thomas

Shamarko Thomas drops a should be interception in Steelers preseason loss to Lions; Photo Credit: Steelers.com

1. 1990 – Steelers Tread Treacherous Terrain of Walton’s Mountain

One surprise following the 1989 Steelers story book season was Chuck Noll’s decision, under pressure from the front office, to dismiss Tom Moore and hire Joe Walton as his offensive coordinator. On paper, the move looked smart. Walton’s offensive mind was well-regarded throughout the league.

  • The reality was something different.

In an August preseason game vs. the Washington Redskins, (yours truly’s first pro football game) the Steelers offense played dazed and confused, as Bubby Brister, Rick Strom and Randy Wright combined for 148 yards, most of which was gained during the game’s final two minutes. Afterwards, Chuck Noll opined that the only place the Steelers offense had to was up….

The 1990 Steelers opened the season without scoring an offensive touchdown during September.
Although the offense did find some rhythm in the middle of 1990, missed opportunities, misused personnel and miscommunication ultimately characterized Joe Walton’s tenure as Steelers offensive coordinator.

2. 1995 Bam is No Barry

Injuries, attitude and declining production prompted Pittsburgh to part ways with one-time franchise running back Barry Foster in the 1995 off season. The emergence of Bam Morris in 1994 made the Steelers decision much easier.

  • Steelers running back’s coach Dick Hoak raved about Morris during training camp.

But the truth is, Bam Morris’ preseason performances were forgettable.

Statistics are not easily available from those preseason contests. The record shows that Bam Morris did run well vs. the Bills in the Steelers first outing, going 4 for 24, but he went 7 of 16 in the next.

The latter performance telegraphed Bam Morris’ lack luster start to the 1995 season, where he just barely averaged over 3 yards a carry during the seasons first seven games, before Bill Cowher benched him in favor of Erric Pegram, who was an unsung hero of the 1995 AFC Championship season.

3. 1996 3 Headed Quarterback Derby Spins Its Wheels

When Neil O’Donnell departed after Super Bowl XXX the Steelers opted to promote from within as Bill Cowher held a three way quarterback competition in training camp between Mike Tomczak, Jim Miller and Kordell Stewart.

Mike Tomczak, Kordell Stewart, Pittsburgh Steelers, Steelers quarterbacks 1990's, steelers preseason quarterbacks, bill cowher quarterback competition

Mike Tomczak and Kordell Stewart quarterbacked the Steelers in the mid-late 1990’s. Photo Credit: Peter Diana, Post-Gazette

  • The Steelers meticulously split time between the three quarterbacks, down to ensure equal practice snaps.

Bill Cowher hopped that one man would establish himself.

Unfortunately none did. Bill Cowher declared Jim Miller the starter just before the regular season, but clarified he was making a gut decision. Cowher didn’t trust his gut that much, as Jim Miller’s time as the Steelers starting quarterback lasted all of one half, as Cowher benched him in favor of Mike Tomczak.

While Tomczak led the 1996 Steelers to a 10-6 record and an AFC Central Championship, by the time December arrived it was clear that Tomczak wasn’t going to take the Steelers on a deep playoff run as Bill Cowher began to give Kordell Stewart time, who also wasn’t ready to be a signal caller.

4. 1998 Steelers Lost without John Jackson

John Jackson got blown away in the final preseason game of the 1988 season, infuriating Chuck Noll so much that the Emperor had to be talked out of cutting him. Fortunately Noll listened to his assistants, as John Jackson would be a mainstay at left tackle for the Steelers for the next decade.

But when John Jackson reached free agency at age 32 in 1997 and the San Diego Chargers offered to make Jackson the highest paid offensive lineman in the league, the Steelers said so long.

  • It was a wise move, and the Steelers had invested heavily in drafting offensive lineman to replace him.

Unfortunately, none of them were up to the task. Bill Cowher tried various combinations at both tackle positions throughout the preseason as Jerome Bettis struggled to finding holes. Finally, Cowher moved Will Wolford to left tackle, slide Justin Strzelczyk to right tackle, and the offensive line was OK, until Strzelczyk got injured in a Monday night contest vs. the Kansas City Chiefs.

Jamain Stephens, 1996’s first round draft pick, finally got his chance to start, but the image of Bettis lighting into Stephens for not blocking well enough is the enduring memory of his tenure at right tackle.

It wouldn’t be until 2000 that the Steelers restored stability to left tackle, and their entire offensive line, but the troubles the Steelers experienced during their 1998 preseason campaign foreshadowed it all.

5. 2013 0-4 Preseason Foreshadows 0-4 Steelers Start

Look at the Steelers preseason results from 2007 to 2012 and there’s one constant X-1. The Steelers never lost more than a single game in preseason, irrespective if they finished 8-8 and out of the playoffs or playing in the Super Bowl.

  • Then came the Steelers 2013 preseason campaign.

For the first time in the Mike Tomlin era and the first time since Bill Cowher’s final season, the Steelers laid a goose egg in preseason. Commentator’s cautioned “Its only preseason” and Mike Tomlin explained the losses away, indicating that the men largely responsible for those losing efforts would find themselves on the waiver wire.

  • And they did. But those preseason losses also revealed the limits of the Steelers depth.

Depth that injuries to the starting running back, the two chief backup running backs, two starting tight ends, starting center, starting cornerback, and starting inside linebacker would test to the limit. The end result was the Steelers 0-4 start after an embarrassing loss in London to the Vikings.

In 2014 and 2015 the Steelers went 1-3 and 1-4 in the preseason, yet finished in the playoffs both times, so the “its only preseason” credo held true then. But 2013 was one year when piss-poor preseason performance signaled real trouble, at least at the start of the season.

 

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Steelers Hall of Famer Kevin Greene Brought “Blitzgurgh” to Pittsburgh

If you’re a Steelers fan and familiar with Pittsburgh’s  usual participation in the annual free agent frenzy that began in 1992, you’ve probably long-since resigned yourself to not expecting much in the way of splash-signings.

  • But, believe it or not, one of the Steelers first free agent signings was of the high-profile variety.

It came about following a high-profile defection, when Jerrol Williams, a fourth round pick out of Purdue in the 1989 NFL Draft who had just supplanted veteran Bryan Hinkle as the starter at left outside linebacker in 1992, signed a restricted free agent deal with the Chargers.

How would the Steelers, who were coming off one of their best seasons in years under first-year head coach Bill Cowher, respond and reload for the 1993 campaign?

Steelers Hall of Famer Kevin Green, Blitzburgh, Steelers, Steelers 1990s, Greg Lloyd

Steelers Hall of Famer Kevin Greene brought Blitzburgh to Pittsburgh; Photo Credit: USA Today Sports

  • By courting and then signing 31-year old veteran Kevin Greene, who racked up 72.5 career sacks in eight seasons with the Rams.

To say Kevin Greene, who will be enshrined in the Pro Football Hall of Fame this weekend and has made it known his favorite years were spent in Pittsburgh, and that he wants to have his official ring ceremony take place at Heinz Field in 2016, was an upgrade over the younger Williams is an understatement.

Kevin Greene Brings Blitzburgh to Pittsburgh

In ’93, Greene led the Steelers with 12.5 sacks and doubled the total of defensive end Donald Evans, who finished second with 6.5.

Perhaps more importantly, Greene made right legendary outside linebacker Greg Lloyd even more dangerous by creating a “pick your poison” scenario for opposing offenses. While Greg Lloyd recorded “only” six sacks in ’93, he had 111 tackles and five forced fumbles. Following such a great all-around season of devastation, Lloyd, who had already played in two Pro Bowls by that point, was named a First-team All-Pro for the first time in his career.

Two more All-Pro seasons followed for Greg Lloyd in subsequent years, and he was named the team MVP and UPI AFC Defensive Player of the Year in 1994.

All the while, Greene was doing what he did best: Sack the quarterback. While Greg Lloyd had arguably his best season in ’94, totaling 10 sacks and five forced fumbles, Greene posted an incredible 14 sacks, a record that would stand until James Harrison broke it in 2008 (despite defenders holding Silverback on nearly EVERY play.)

That kind of production from your outside linebackers in a 3-4, zone-blitz scheme is a dream-come-true. And, in Pittsburgh, with creative Steelers fans in abundance, this is going to lead to a nickname–or two.

  • Quiver and Quake was a sign often seen hanging at old Three Rivers Stadium–Lloyd was the Quiver to Greene’s Quake.

Another nickname that became popular during the ’94 campaign was “Blitzburgh,” coined by Myron Cope after the defense recorded 55 sacks.

Blitzburgh may not be as enduring as “The Steel Curtain,” the nickname given to the legendary ’70s Steelers defenses, but when you hear it, it certainly reminds you of players like Greene and Lloyd, and the havoc they wreaked on opposing offenses in the mid-’90s.

Greene left as a free agent after the 1995 season, following the loss to the Cowboys in Super Bowl XXX, and to tell you the truth, I didn’t think he considered his short three year stay in Pittsburgh to be that special.

But when you think about it, Greene got to play for an enthusiastic players’ coach in Cowher; the universally loved Dick LeBeau was the secondary coach and then the defensive coordinator during Greene’s stay in Pittsburgh; he played in-front of maybe the most passionate fans in all of sports and in one of the loudest places in Three Rivers Stadium; and he also made his only trip to the Super Bowl.

Kevin Greene Best Steelers Free Agent Signing Ever?

As fans, we sometimes reduce everything down to championships. The linebacker combo of Greene and Lloyd wasn’t as impressive as the duo of James Harrison and LaMarr Woodley, who teamed up for a combined 72 sacks from 2008-2010 and helped lead the Steelers to two Super Bowls and one Lombardi.

  • But those years in the mid-’90s, when Lloyd and Greene combined for 58 sacks and five Pro Bowls (Greene was also named a First-team All-Pro in ’94) weren’t so bad, either.

As far as free agents in Steelers history, other than James Farrior and Jeff Hartings, it’s hard to name a better one than Greene, who totaled 35.5 sacks during his three years in Pittsburgh.

The Rooneys sure got their money’s worth during Kevin Greene’s three years in Pittsburgh. Not only was he very productive, but the team was exciting, the fans were passionate, and it was fun to root for the Pittsburgh Steelers again.

Kevin Greene had a big role in making it fun to be a Pittsburgh Steeler again. It was also a time Kevin Greene has certainly never forgotten. Neither will Steelers Nation.

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